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"Crazy Rich Asians" becomes most successful studio rom-com at the box office in 9 years

(L to R) Michelle Yeoh, Henry Golding and Constance Wu star in "Crazy Rich Asians."

Warner Bros.

Labor Day weekend marked yet another record-breaking box office performance for the romantic comedy "Crazy Rich Asians." The film became the most successful studio rom-com in nine years, since 2009's "The Proposal."

"Crazy Rich Asians" topped the domestic box office again for the third weekend in a row, bringing in an estimated additional $22.2 million as of Sunday. With a total of $111 million from North American theaters so far, the film's earnings have already surpassed the lifetime domestic total of 2015's "Trainwreck," the last major studio rom-com box office success. "The Proposal," starring Sandra Bullock and Ryan Reynolds, earned $164 million in North America in 2009, not adjusted for inflation.

"Crazy Rich Asians," which stars Constance Wu and Henry Golding, has had a stronger opening than any other comedy this year.

The film might have one of the biggest Labor Day box office weekends ever, as well. "Halloween" opened with $30.6 million during Labor Day weekend in 2007, and projections are pegging "Crazy Rich Asians" at up to $30 million for the full holiday weekend by the time final numbers are reported. This past weekend's ticket sales only decreased by 10 percent from last weekend's sales. 

Warner Bros. is already working on plans for a sequel for the hit film. The original team -- director Jon Chu and producers Nina Jacobson, Brad Simpson and John Penotti -- are all expected to return. 

"Crazy Rich Asians" is the first studio movie to feature a mostly Asian cast since "The Joy Luck Club" 25 years ago. Star Awkwafina told CBS News ahead of the film's release that she doesn't think the future of Asian representation in Hollywood should depend on the success of "Crazy Rich Asians."

"Of course you can say there's pressure on this movie," she says. "At the same time, I don't think the success of the movie should dictate whether or not there should be Asian-Americans in film. I don't think 'Crazy Rich Asians' will be the last, no matter how it does."

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    Andrea is an entertainment producer at CBSNews.com