Film goes behind the scenes of Anthony Weiner scandal

Documentary reveals toll of Anthony Weiner's ... 02:25

Two years after the sexting scandal cost former New York congressman Anthony Weiner his job, the disgraced Democrat attempted a return to politics with a run for mayor of New York. Filmmakers Josh Kriegman and Elyse Steinberg were there to document it.

CBS News correspondent John Blackstone reports the filmmakers deny reports that Hillary Clinton's campaign pressured them to make changes to their film, "Weiner," which features Weiner's wife, Huma Abedin, a top Clinton adviser.

"For us it was really about showing what it was like to be in the center of a media firestorm," Steinberg said.

What a firestorm it was. In the midst of the campaign came new revelations of more embarrassing self-portraits.

"I have said that other texts and photos were likely to come out and today they have," Weiner said.

As another Weiner scandal played out in front of the national media, Kriegman and Steinberg were watching it unfold from the inside, with Weiner and his wife Huma Abedin.

Rebecca Follo, who was at the Sundance premiere, said watching that was excruciating.

"Excruciating to watch these human beings going through this -- especially his wife of course," Follo said.

The movie's showcase at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah Sunday may have had much to do with the fact that this is an election year, and Abedin is a top adviser to Clinton.

"The value in this film is all about Huma because whether people come to see it or not, it really kind of depends on how in tune they are to the political race and Hillary and Huma's presence in that sphere," said New York Times reporter Brooks Barnes.

The film reveals Abedin told Weiner she won't join him at a campaign event because one of Hillary Clinton's advisers tells her she shouldn't go.

Barnes said this parallels former President Bill Clinton and Hillary.

"And so the lawyers of Huma really stand out. The parallels can't be ignored. Because they're just staring at you in bright lights," Barnes said.

The filmmakers say they hope the documentary shows viewers the complex realities beyond the headlines.

"The film is about how much our politics today has become sort of overwhelmed by this impulse towards sensationalism and spectacle and you get to see that play out," Kriegman said. "And we're looking forward to being part of the conversation."

"Weiner" will be in theaters this May.