What would a new Air Force One look like under Trump?

WASHINGTON -- Air Force One, the 747 that carries the president, could be getting a major makeover. President Trump is reportedly considering changing the color scheme that's adorned the plane for decades, according to the news site Axios.

The blue and white Air Force One owes its iconic look to President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jackie.

"It was all part of this whole pattern of him trying to create increased visibility of the presidency as an active office and a glamorous office which he succeeded in doing," said Ken Walsh, who wrote "Air Force One: A History of the Presidents and Their Planes."

"President Trump is perfectly willing to upend a lot of the norms of Washington and the conventions of Washington, and it appears that includes Air Force One," Walsh said.

Air Force One

Air Force One is seen on the tarmac on December 6, 2016 at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland.

Getty Images

Shortly after taking office, Mr. Trump took the unusual step of personally negotiating with Boeing for two brand new 747s. They'll be delivered sometime after 2020, but may drop the iconic look for a new Trump-inspired red, white and blue design.

Mr. Trump would not be the first commander-in-chief to make changes to a presidential aircraft. Harry Truman left behind Roosevelt's nondescript "Sacred Cow" for the eye-catching "Independence," painted as an eagle.

President Eisenhower got the first jet, going with a standard military paint job. But every president since Kennedy has stayed with the look he created.

"It's just the concern that President Trump the showman is going to go too far with changing the look of this iconic plane that so many people are familiar with and a lot of people wonder why do it?" Walsh said.

Another of the reported changes Mr. Trump is considering is a bigger presidential bed onboard the new plane. The current bed has been compared to a futon. 

  • Kris Van Cleave

    Kris Van Cleave was appointed CBS News Transportation Correspondent in September 2015 and is based in Washington, D.C.