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​Ted Cruz says he was just a "baby lawyer" when he worked for John Boehner

Last Updated Apr 29, 2016 1:39 PM EDT

On Friday, Ted Cruz revisited former House Speaker John Boehner's comments about him, in which he compared Cruz to "Lucifer in the flesh," and called him a "son of a bitch."

In an interview with Fox News' Sean Hannity Friday, Cruz said, "I don't know John Boehner. I don't think we said 50 words together in our lives," reiterating his earlier response to Boehner's name-calling this week.

However, Boehner has also said in the past that Cruz was his lawyer, which Hannity raised in the interview.

"I was a junior lawyer. My boss was hired to be [Boehner's] lawyer," Cruz explained. "So I worked on the case. I worked on some appellate briefs. I don't know that I ever met him. We haven't said 50 words to each other in our lives. I was a baby lawyer a couple years out of law school working on editing some briefs and helping write them. But I don't know the man."

And Cruz is also refuting the delegate allocation out of Pennsylvania that's been reported by the Associated Press. The AP says that Donald Trump has picked up the endorsements of another 33 unbound delegates, on top of the 17 he had already been awarded for winning the primary last week.

"The AP numbers are bogus because what they've done is given all of unbound delegates in Pennsylvania to Donald Trump," Cruz told Hannity during the interview, which will air Friday night. "Those delegates are not his -- that's just reporters who want to run up his total."

He went on to say that "the media doesn't get to assume" that every unbound delegate is supporting Trump. "I believe nobody is going to get to 1,237," the number needed to clinch the GOP nomination.

But by CBS News' own count, Trump can expect to win at least 25 of the unbound Pennsylvania delegates. CBS News' DJ Judd and Katiana Krawchenko reached over 30 of the unbound delegates, and 25 of them had said they would support either Trump either out of personal preference or because he was the candidate who had won his or her district in the primaries last week.

CBS News' Alan He contributed to this report