Susan Sarandon Didn't Think Tim Robbins Split Would Happen

Actress Susan Sarandon attends the US Stop Sex Trafficking Of Children & Young People Campaign kick off event on July 30, 2010, in New York.
Joe Corrigan/Getty Images
Actress Susan Sarandon attends the US Stop Sex Trafficking Of Children & Young People Campaign kick off event on July 30, 2010, in New York.
Joe Corrigan/Getty Images

NEW YORK (CBS) When Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins split after 23 years together, many were surprised - including Sarandon herself.

"People were coming up to me in the street and saying, 'I cried and cried when I heard,' " Sarandon, 64, told Britain's Telegraph of her breakup with Robbins, 51. "Well, I was sadder! I didn't think it would ever happen, either."

Pictures: Susan Sarandon

She said that the relationship had simply run its course.

"You bring people into your life at certain times," she explained. "Maybe you have a relationship to have children and you realize that it's fulfilled after that point."

She and Robbins famously never married, despite being together for more than two decades.

"I've always liked the idea of choosing to be with somebody. I thought that if you didn't get married you wouldn't take each other for granted as easily. I don't know if after 20-something years that was still true," she said.

The star, who is currently appearing in "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps," admits her life has taken some unexpected turns, including owning SPiN, a New York ping pong club.

"If you'd told me a year ago I would own a ping-pong club I would have laughed until I fell on the ground. It just kind of happened - the people who asked me were so enthusiastic about the idea that it was infectious. I think it is a riot that everybody takes the game so seriously."

She's also been linked romantically to her SPiN business partner, 31-year-old Jonathan Bricklin. She didn't confirm or deny the rumors, only saying that "There are lots of people in my life at the moment."

She added: "What I've realized in my old age is that your relationship with people or with your job has to be a growing organism. It's not something where you reach a certain point and then you start preserving it. You have to nurture it, you have to stay curious and hungry and foolish. Once you stop doing that you get satisfied and you get stuck."

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