Preview: Ice Cube says he's always trying to convince people he's not "yesterday's news"

The rapper, producer, actor and entrepreneur who has always sought to prove himself is now backing the new Big 3 Basketball League.

CBS News

By any measure, rapper-actor-producer-entrepreneur Ice Cube has been successful in his career. However, he still feels like he has to convince people he's on top of his game, he tells Tracy Smith in an interview for CBS' "Sunday Morning," to be broadcast August 12.

Being doubted, Ice Cube (whose real name is O'Shea Jackson) tells Smith, is his greatest setback.

"You know, doubted all the time, you know, as far as things I wanna do in entertainment," he said. "You still always gotta convince people that you're at the top of your game and that you're not yesterday's news."

Today, he's one of the most bankable stars in the movie business. He broke into films in 1991 in "Boyz n the Hood," after a groundbreaking career with the rap pioneers N.W.A.  He's been working in films ever since, including acting in "21 Jump Street" and "Barbershop," while also serving as a producer on "Straight Outta Compton," a docudrama on his time with N.W.A., starring his son.

Still, he tells Smith, he's trying to prove himself.

"Always. I mean, just, you know, just being black – I'm gonna have a chip on my shoulder about being successful. Because I know I gotta do the extra things, I gotta go the extra miles, gotta make sure it's perfect to get what I deserve. So, that's just in my DNA. And it's always gonna be there."

In addition to his many entertainment ventures, and being a married father of four, Ice Cube is focused on being a co-founder of the Big 3 Basketball League, a 3-on-3 league featuring many former NBA regulars. Some of them had figured their playing days were over until the new league came along.

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Correspondent Tracy Smith with Ice Cube, co-founder of the Big 3 Basketball League.

CBS News

Ice Cube says he gets satisfaction out of helping others: "Man, that's one of the best parts," he told Smith. "All the thank-yous I get from guys who said, 'Man, I was lost, I was looking for something to do.' And I just imagine, you know, you're 33, 34. Somebody tells you, 'It's over. You can't do what you do anymore.' Basically, 'Beat it.'"

In the wide-ranging interview, Smith also talks with Ice Cube about his parents, his wife, and his legacy.

The Emmy Award-winning program, hosted by Jane Pauley, is broadcast on CBS Sundays beginning at 9:00 a.m. ET. Executive producer is Rand Morrison.

"Sunday Morning" also streams on CBSN beginning at 9:30 a.m. ET and repeated at 1 p.m. ET, and is available on cbs.com, CBS All Access, and On Demand. You can also download the free "Sunday Morning" audio podcast at iTunes and at Play.it

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