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Satellite captures total eclipse as seen from space

The EPIC camera aboard NASA and NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured images of the moon's shadow moving across the Earth during a total solar eclipse, March 9, 2016.

NASA DSCOVR EPIC team

While millions of people across the Pacific observed this week's total solar eclipse, NASA's DSCOVR satellite captured an amazing view of its own: the shadow of the moon as it skittered across the globe, blocking the sun's rays from Earth.

The animation was created from 13 images captured by the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), the nation's first deep space satellite orbiting one million miles away from Earth.

The animation shows the shadow of the moon passing over the Indian Ocean, Indonesia and Australia, then into open water and the islands of Oceania.

DSCOVR is situated in a stable orbit between Earth and the sun. Its primary mission is to monitor the solar wind for space weather forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). It also provides daily color images of Earth as seen from space.