Moscow-based cybersecurity firm appeals DHS decision to ban its software

Moscow-based cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab is appealing the decision by the Department of Homeland Security to ban its software from government computers. The U.S. intelligence community fears that Russian intelligence has access to the company's files and software.

In a statement, the company complained that the move by DHS was unconstitutional and denied it due process.

"The company asserts that the DHS's decision is unconstitutional and relied on subjective, non-technical public sources such as uncorroborated and often anonymously sourced media reports, related claims and rumors. Furthermore, DHS has failed to provide the company adequate due process to rebut the unsubstantiated allegations underlying the Directive and has not provided any evidence of wrongdoing by the company," Kaspersky Lab said..

Kaspersky says DHS's actions "have caused undue damage to both the company's reputation in the IT security industry and its sales in the U.S."

Kaspersky software has been cited in a large data theft of U.S. government intelligence documents from a National Security Agency worker. The fear is that Kaspersky's anti-virus software, which is supposed to protect users from malicious activity, could actually provide Russian intelligence with valuable information.

CBS News confirmed in August that FBI officials had met with private industry representatives to relay their concerns about Kaspersky Lab

In September, DHS ordered federal agencies to remove software that the company sold. They had 30 days to identify Kaspersky products and were required to phase the products out within 90 days. 

CBS News' Andres Triay contributed to this report.