ISIS gaining ground despite U.S. airstrikes

President Obama meets with military commanders from more than 20 countries on Tuesday to discuss how to fight the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

The terror group is gaining more ground in Syria and Iraq, even after weeks of airstrikes by the U.S. and other countries, reports CBS News correspondent Holly Williams.

ISIS militants have captured an Iraqi army camp in Hit, west of Baghdad, as the Islamic extremists edge closer to total control of Iraq's Anbar Province.

Iraqi government soldiers were forced to withdraw despite U.S. airstrikes aimed at pushing ISIS back.

The militants now control a swath of territory connecting Baghdad to the Syrian-Turkish border where ISIS is battling for control of the town of Kobani. There are new reports that the Islamic extremists are using suicide bombers in Kobani as they try to advance street by street.

Turkish tanks and troops are massed on the border, but have so far not intervened.

U.S. officials said on Sunday that Turkey had agreed to allow airstrikes against ISIS to be launched from Turkish territory. But yesterday Turkey's government contradicted those U.S. officials and said there was no deal.

Turkey's leaders claim the U.S.-led strikes are actually strengthening the Syrian regime, and in return for Turkey's help in the coalition against ISIS, they want the U.S. to set up a no-fly zone in northern Syria.