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How members of Congress voted on the impeachment of President Trump

What is the lasting impact of impeachment?
What is the lasting impact of impeachment? 04:10

President Trump became the third president in American history to be impeached when members of Congress voted Wednesday night to charge him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. 

The vote on Article One, abuse of power, was 230-197, with one vote of present. All Republicans voted against the article, joined by two Democrats. The vote on Article Two, obstruction of Congress, was 229-198, with one vote of present. All Republicans voted against the article, joined by three Democrats. 

The House's action tees up a Senate trial, likely early next month. 

Which Democrats voted against impeachment?

  • Congressman Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, who is expected to switch parties soon, voted against the first and second articles of impeachment. 
  • Congressman Collin Peterson of Minnesota voted against the first and second articles of impeachment. 
  • Congressman Jared Golden of Maine voted against the second article of impeachment, obstruction of Congress. Golden voted in favor of the first article, abuse of power. 
  • All other Democrats voted for impeachment. 

Which Republicans voted for impeachment?

  • No Republicans ultimately voted for either article of impeachment. One Republican was briefly marked as voting for impeachment, likely an error, before swiftly changing that vote. 

Which other votes stood out?

  • Congressman Justin Amash: One other member voted for both articles of impeachment: Amash, a former Republican who became an independent over the summer. Democrats praised Amash before the vote on the House floor. 

Who voted "present?"

  • Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard: Perhaps the biggest surprise of the night came when Representative Tulsi Gabbard, a Democrat from Hawaii who is running for president, voted "present" on both articles. Gabbard had been coy about her vote ahead of Wednesday night. "After doing my due diligence in reviewing the 658-page impeachment report, I came to the conclusion that I could not in good conscience vote either yes or no. I am standing in the center and have decided to vote present," Gabbard said in a statement. Although Gabbard is running for president, she is not running for re-election
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