Chloe Grace Moretz says she was once body-shamed by a male co-star

Chloe Grace Moretz attends the 2017 CFDA Fashion Awards at Hammerstein Ballroom on June 5, 2017 in New York City.

Roy Rochlin/Getty Images

Chloe Grace Moretz says that a male co-star once body-shamed her when she was just 15, telling her he would "never date" her in real life because she was "too big." 

Moretz talked to Variety and said the actor was older -- "23, 24 or 25" -- when they were working on a film together.

"This guy that was my love interest was like, 'I'd never date you in a real life,' and I was like, 'What?' And he was like, 'Yeah, you're too big for me' — as in my size," Moretz said.

She added that the man was one of the only actors who made her cry on set and that it was difficult for her to return to work.

"I went bawling to my brother and he was like, 'What happened?' And I was like, 'He told me I was too big,'" she said. 

She continued, "I had to pick it up and go back on set and pretend he was a love interest, and it was really hard … It just makes you realize that there are some really bad people out there and for some reason, he felt the need to say that to me. You have to kind of forgive and not forget really, but it was just like wow. It was jarring. I look back on it and I was 15, which is really, really dark."

Moretz, who is an outspoken feminist, said that was not the only time she was mistreated by a male colleague on set. She said she was once ostracized by a different male colleague who allegedly lied about her to the director. 

"Things that are crazy, things that I would never do, unprofessional things that would make no sense," Moretz said of what her colleague told the director. 

Moretz added to Variety that she wants to see more female filmmakers in Hollywood. 

 "We're making big steps, but it's a long way," she said. "We're nowhere near the top. We're just catching up. We have a long way to go."

In June, Moretz said she was "appalled" when an ad for her movie, "Red Shoes & the 7 Dwarfs," appeared to body-shame women. The ad depicted a tall, thin woman in red heels next to a shorter, heavier version of herself holding her heels. The tagline promoted a Snow White who was no longer beautiful. 

Moretz claimed that she and her team never approved the marketing for the film. 

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