Big Ben: Players May Not Admit Concussions

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, right, makes a statement at the Steelers offices in Pittsburgh, as coach Mike Timlin looks on, Thursday, July 23, 2009. Roethlisberger says allegations by a Lake Tahoe casino hostess that he raped her a year ago are "reckless and false." (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar
Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger supports the NFL's stricter policies on allowing players back on the field after sustaining head injuries. But will players comply?

Speaking to reporters in Green Bay on a conference call Wednesday, Roethlisberger said he believed league officials have players' best interests in mind. But Roethlisberger suspects players won't be "completely honest" about injuries because they want to keep playing.

"All of us want to be fathers and husbands someday. In that sense, I think it's good," Roethlisberger said. "I think it does run the risk that we are tough guys, we want to play through things and I think guys will not be completely honest, for fear that they can't get back in the game. I think it's kind of a double-edged sword."

Roethlisberger sat out the Steelers' Nov. 29 loss at Baltimore because of a concussion.

60 Minutes: Concussions Linked to Brain Disease

This month, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell sent a memo to teams saying a player should not be allowed to return to action if he showed certain symptoms, including an inability to remember assignments or plays, a gap in memory, persistent dizziness, and persistent headaches.

The previous standard said a player should not be allowed to return if he lost consciousness.

Nearly one-fifth of 160 NFL players surveyed by The Associated Press from Nov. 2-15 replied that they have hidden or played down the effects of a concussion.