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Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Workstations

Workstations

Workstations

High cubicle walls and fluorescent lighting create a depressing workplace where coworkers are isolated from each other. (Photo by Steve Jaspar)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Workstations

Workstations

Workstations

At real-estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle, a redesign lowered cubicle walls to give the office an open feel. This also makes the office quieter: passersby will instinctively lower their voices when they can make eye contact with those working at desks. (Photo by Christopher Barrett/Hedrich Blessing)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Break Areas

Break Areas

Break Areas

Bad lighting, gray walls, no windows: the old break room at Jones Lang LaSalle was no "break" at all. (Photo courtesy Jones Lang LaSalle)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Break Areas

Break Areas

Break Areas

Jones Lang LaSalle's new, improved break room (seen through the doors) opens into a training room. Light from windows and non-fluorescent fixtures give it a living-room feel. The space is also flexible: the doors can be pushed aside to join the two rooms. (Photo by Christopher Barrett/Hedrich Blessing)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Front Desk

Front Desk

Front Desk

Hammock Publishing's front desk was drab and unimpressive. It said nothing to visitors about the company and what it does. (Photo courtesy Advent Marketing Results)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Front Desk

Front Desk

Front Desk

After a two-week "lobby makeover" by Advent, the new entrance broadcasts Hammock Publishing's brand to customers and reminds employees of the company mission. (Photo courtesy Advent Marketing Results)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Collaboration Space

Collaboration Space

Collaboration Space

Quick scrums were difficult at the offices of Jones Lang LaSalle: If employees gathered at a table like this one, they would disturb others working at their desks. (Photo courtesy Jones Lang LaSalle)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Collaboration Space

Collaboration Space

Collaboration Space

In their redesigned offices, Jones Lang LaSalle team members can gather quickly in an "iso pod" — a small enclosed office that doesn't need to be reserved. (Photo by Christopher Barrett/Hedrich Blessing)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Windows

Windows

Windows

Historically, window offices have been a perk of highly paid executives. The ultimate "corner office" in American culture is, of course, an oval. (Photo courtesy the National Archives and Records Administration)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."

Image Gallery: Best and Worst Workplace Design

Windows

Windows

Windows

Since today's executives spend a lot of time in meetings and traveling, their corner offices often sit empty. Giving this prime real estate to cubicle dwellers, who sit at their desks all day, boosts morale and increases their productivity. (Photo by Joshua Wickerham)

For tips on tuning up your workspace, return to "Office Makeovers That Boost the Bottom Line."
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