What the government shutdown will mean for federal workers

WASHINGTON - The government shutdown will furlough roughly 800,000 federal workers, including Talana Morton-Smith, who is an IT specialist with the National Endowment for the Humanities. "We have mortgages, we have children in school, you know we have bills," Morton-Smith said.

She'd be left without a paycheck until a new spending bill is passed, and so would congressional staffers. But their bosses, members of Congress, the president and the vice president would still be paid.

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Talana Morton-Smith

CBS News

"The military will still go to work," said Mick Mulvaney, Office of Management and Budget director. "They will not get paid."

During the 2013 shutdown, Congress passed a bill allowing paychecks for military personnel and supporting civilians, and all federal workers ultimately received back pay.

"The border will still be patrolled, they will not get paid," said Mulvaney. "Fire folks will still be fighting the fires out west, they will not get paid."

In the midst of a severe flu season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would have to shut down its annual flu program.

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National parks and monuments would stay open if the government shuts down

CBS News

Unlike in 2013, the Trump administration will keep open national parks and monuments. But it's not a total win for tourists, since the Smithsonian says museums and the National Zoo would stay open through the weekend, but close on Monday. So get your 'panda cam' viewing in now because that shuts down with a shutdown.

"A shutdown is always heartbreaking and the uncertainty that comes along with it," said Morton-Smith.

Social Security checks would still be mailed out and because the Postal Service has its own funding, mail will still be delivered and post offices will remain open. But it all comes at a cost, since the two-week 2013 shutdown cost the economy roughly $24 billion.

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    Julianna Goldman is a CBS News correspondent based in the Washington bureau.