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Walker Is Heard

CIA officers Johnny "mike" Spann and "Dave" interview American Taliban John Walker. Terror.
CBS
The first time the world got a glimpse of John Walker Lindh he had just been taken prisoner along with hundreds of other Taliban troops and was stubbornly silent when confronted by two U.S. agents.

Nothing the agents did or said could provoke an answer from the young American that day.

Videotape of Walker just obtained by CBS News was taken several days later, after the Taliban prisoners had revolted. Walker was one of the few to survive the prison uprising near Mazar-e-Sharif and, reports CBS News Correspondent Jim Stewart, northern alliance soldiers are about to learn that this is no ordinary prisoner.

Q: "Where you from? Hey! Where you from?"

Walker: "Washington, D.C."

Q: "Washington, D.C.? What is your name?"

Walker: "Abdul Hamid."

Q: "Abdul Hamid?"

Abdul Hamid was apparently Walker's chosen Taliban name. With other wounded screaming in the background, Walker told his interrogators he was a student.


Click here to watch the exclusive new video of Walker.


Q: "Which course? Which course?"

Walker: "Shari'at."

Q: "Shari'at?"

Walker: "Shari'at, Arabic language."

Walker, too, is wounded.

Q: "Where you become injured?"

Walker: "Sick from the cold. Sick from the cold, from the water."

Q: "In Mazar-e-Sharif?"

Walker: "Mazar-e-Sharif. I have a bullet in my leg."

Q: "Where?"

Walker: "Here. No, here."

Only when his captors mangle his father's name does the glaze lift from Walker's eyes.

Walker: "My father's name, you mean? It was Frank."

Q: "Fank?"

Walker: "No, no. Frank."

Walker is currently being held at Marine Camp Rhino in Afghanistan. Unlike his earlier interrogation, he is now cooperating. U.S. officials say he has told them that al-Qaida plans two more waves of attacks on the United States. Frankly, however, they doubt that Walker knows that level of detail.

His family, meanwhile, has released pictures of John Walker Lindh as a child and of him clowning around with his father, Frank. The intent, it would seem, is to portray their son as just another innocent boy who made the wrong choice -- and not the deliberate Taliban warrior that could lead him to face charges of treason.

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