Live

Watch CBSN Live

The Film Lingo Final

You say you want to be a Hollywood player. Or even a poseur. How, then, to sound credible? Learn the jargon.

Out there in LaLa Land, they have a language all their own. And several Hollywood watchers – Premiere Magazine west coast editor Anne Thompson; entertainment writer Bill Higgins, and Hollywood Reporter editor Alex Ben Block – let us in on the industry lingo.

To see how well you can talk the talk of the town, take our quiz. Just match the word or phrase with the correct definition.

Cratered:
a. When a film project dies (or, is "put in a crate")
b. When a movie bombs ("It really cratered")
c. Any film footage taken of the moon
d. Film stock that is ripped
E-Ride:
a. Making an appearance on the E! Entertainment Network
b. Burt Reynolds' roller-coaster career
c. A drive down Sunset Boulevard
d. A movie with spills, chills, and thrills
Franchise Picture:
a. Any of Pamela Lee's "home movies"
b. A movie that has potential for spinning off sequels
c. A film made by more than one studio (such as Titanic)
d. Any celebrity-owned chain of restaurants
In turnaround:
a. A movie project that has been shelved and faces uncertain prospects
b. The life of someone at The Betty Ford Clinic
c. When actors are working out with their personal trainers
d. A new John Travolta dance soon to sweep America
Mansion Movie:
a. The lives of industry people living beyond their means
b. Any film with a huge budget
c. Any movie about the supernatural
d. A Merchant-Ivory type of film set in a big house
Tent Pole:
a. A hit movie that supports the rest of a studio's slate
b. A beam that supports a canopy at a Hollywood party
c. An actor who "steals the picture"
d. The coif of a big-haired actress
Flying Glass Movie:
a. Any entry in the Home Alone series
b. A movie set in a bar
c. An action movie
d. How the town refers to The Mirror Has Two Faces
Log Line:
a. The long line at Farmer's Market to buy a log of goat cheese (the cheese du jour)
b. A TV Guide-like encapsulation of a movie plot
c. A pick-up line used by a producer who wants to add another conquest to his "log"
d. A line of fans waiting for the autograph of Kenny Loggins

Back to
Plot Your Big Break In Hollywood

Build Your Own Plot
Educating Siskel
The Be-Seen Scene
Film-schooled
Written by Rob Medich with graphic design by Dana Byerly and programming by Yevgeny Simkin

View CBS News In
CBS News App Open
Chrome Safari Continue