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Serial killer Anthony Sowell expected to speak at sentencing trial

Anthony Sowell, left, and defense attorney Rufus Sims listen as Common Pleas Court Judge Dick Ambrose, not pictured, reads a guilty verdict in one of multiple aggravated murder charges in the slayings of 11 women in Cleveland on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Marvin Fong, Pool)
Marvin Fong
Serial killer Anthony Sowell breaks down at sentencing
Anthony Sowell, left, and defense attorney Rufus Sims verdict is read July 22, 2011
AP/Marvin Fong

(CBS/WOIO/AP) CLEVELAND, Ohio - Serial killer Anthony Sowell may take the stand Monday morning in the death penalty phase of his mass murder trial.

Pictures: Anthony Sowell's alleged victims

The jury that convicted 51-year-old Sowell of aggravated murder in the deaths of 11 women is scheduled to continue hearing evidence Monday. It will then recommend either the death penalty or life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Monday's testimony began with social worker Lori Towne, who displayed a chart detailing mental illness and physical problems on both sides of Sowell's family. She said physical and mental problems were "rampant" in the family. Sowell's mother had five children before she turned 18, reports CBS affiliate WOIO.

In the understatement of the trial, Towne called Sowell's family "dysfunctional." She said all of Sowell's siblings reacted to their harsh upbringing by "acting out" in various ways. Towne believes they have no boundaries, reports the station.

Meanwhile, a lawyer for Sowell has said the defense anticipated he would speak to jurors during the sentencing phase.

Sowell broke down a number of times in court last week while friends and family took the stand in his defense.

Police have said Sowell lured victims to his home with the promise of alcohol or drugs. He then killed and dismembered their bodies.

Complete coverage of the Anthony Sowell case on Crimesider