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Senate to hold override vote Wednesday after Obama veto of 9/11 lawsuit bill

The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the seat of government for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. The building has a central dome above a rotunda with two wings - in this photo to the right (south) is the House of Representatives.

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The Senate will vote Wednesday to override President Obama’s veto of a bill that would allow families of 9/11 victims to sue the government of Saudi Arabia.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s, R-Kentucky, office announced the vote on Monday, but said that the exact timing will be determined later on.

The vote will come after Mr. Obama vetoed the legislation on Friday, and sent Congress a three-page letter explaining the administration’s position. The president has argued that the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act could present consequences in which it could, for example, allow people in other countries to sue the U.S.

The Senate will attempt to override the veto first and then the House would be the next chamber to act. Congress has tried to override five of the president’s vetoes but none has been successful.

In May, the Senate passed the measure by voice vote, and it was sponsored by Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Chuck Schumer, D-New York. The House unanimously approved the bill earlier this month.

In addition to this vote this week, Congress must pass legislation by Friday to keep the government funded and avoid a shutdown on Saturday. Republicans have released a short-term funding bill in the Senate, but many Democrats oppose it because it doesn’t contain funding to help Flint recover from the city’s water crisis. 

  • Rebecca Shabad

    Rebecca Shabad is a video reporter for CBS News Digital.