Power is intermittent as thousands sleep outside in quake-wary Puerto Rico

Some Puerto Ricans still sleeping outside

Most of Puerto Rico could get power back today after the island's strongest earthquake in more than a century. In the southwestern part of the island, the quake knocked some homes right off their foundations.

More than a thousand people slept at an outdoor shelter near a local stadium in the city of Yauco last night, CBS News' Lead National Correspondent David Begnaud reports. Officials are now confident they can restore power.

Authorities said that the combined power from a private power plant and a government-owned plant will be enough electricity to restore power to 80 percent of the island. Social media has lit up with people saying their power was restored — but as soon as it comes back on, it goes out again. Thousands of people are still choosing to sleep outside, rather than returning to their homes, as tremors continue to shake the southwest of the island.

The mayor of Yauco, Angel Torres, was frustrated after a meeting with island officials and FEMA. 

"I'm not feeling good at all. I have to go back to my town to see the face of my people, and try to help them. And we need the help from the government," Torres said.

In Penuelas, mayor Gregory Gonsalez, told Begnaud that he wanted to send the message to the nation that his town is in need of "a lot" of water. According to government officials, water trucks are now on the way to Penuelas.

Later, Mayor Torres told Begnaud that FEMA arrived in Yauco and delivered some supplies, like pillows, blankets, couches.

In Guayanilla, the Immaculate Conception church, built in 1841, was nearly destroyed by Tuesday's  6.4 earthquake, but one crucial piece made it through: a figurine of baby Jesus. 

Since December 28, there have been nearly 2,000 earthquakes in Puerto Rico, 60 of which were felt, and three happened on Friday alone.