Poll: Democrats maintain the edge over Republicans in party affiliation

Peter Mlekuz

More adults in the U.S. identify as Democrats or independents who lean that way compared to those who identify as Republicans or independents who lean that way, according to a survey released by Gallup on Monday.

The poll found that 44 percent of adults identify as Democrats or independents who lean that way and 37 percent said they are Republicans or independents who lean that way.

While 44 percent of voters identified as Democrats or independents who leaned that way a year ago, the number of people who say they are Republican or GOP-leaning is five percentage points lower today, Gallup said.

Over the last decade, Democrats have either tied Republicans in party affiliation or have maintained an edge. In 2008, when President Obama won, 49 percent of people identified as Democrats or leaning Democratic while 38 percent said they identified themselves as Republicans or leaning Republican. After Obama was elected, in December 2008,  only 34 percent said they identified as Republican or leaning Republican.

It's unclear whether this edge will help Democrats win back control of Congress in the 2018 midterm elections next November.

The poll surveyed 14,714 adults between Nov. 1 and 30 with a 1 percentage point margin of error. 

  • Rebecca Shabad

    Rebecca Shabad is a video reporter for CBS News Digital.