Police draw criticism for tactics used against protesters

There is outrage over some of the heavy-handed law enforcement tactics caught on camera during this crisis. In the wake of George Floyd's death in police custody, the controversy can be especially troubling for the nation's African American officers. 

Video captured at a Seattle protest shows a cop putting his knee on a protester.

In Florida, a police officer pushes a woman kneeling with her hands up in the air. Because of his actions, another officer fires back by yelling at him. On Monday, he was relieved of duty.

It's not just police. Protesters have attacked and injured those who have been sworn to protect and serve. 

"I think there's a level of bias that exists in every individual," said Dallas Police Chief Reneé Hall. "And so what we have to do is acknowledge it. And that's what we've done here in the Dallas Police Department, is we've worked really hard on our implicit bias training."

When asked if bias training is enough, Hall responded, "You know, it's a start."

Vincent Montague is the president of the Black Shield Police Association and a sergeant with the Cleveland Police Department. 

"One of the images that hit me hard when I was younger, was seeing a picture of Emmett Till, and now my sons have to see this image," Montague told CBS News. "And that affected me, and I was hoping they wouldn't have to see nothing like that again. And it's sad that it's 2020, and here we are."

"I actually cried with my wife," Montague said. "It was hurtful to see that. It's an image you don't want to see in policing, but in humanity as well."

In an open letter signed by Montague, the Black Shield Police Association expressed "deepest and heartfelt sympathy for the family, friends and loved ones of Mr. George Floyd, Ms. Breonna Taylor, and Mr. Ahmaud Arbery."

"We, as Black and minority officers aim to provide continues support for our communities — both near and far," the letter concludes.

"We can't be afraid to hold someone accountable ...," Montague said about the officers seen pinning Floyd down during his arrest. "Sometimes it's hard for officers to step outside that box but now, it's time."

"What we do right now is so important," Montague continued. "It means so much to me right now. Because I just don't want to see my son on the news, and he's another George Floyd. I don't want to see that."