Newly released video shows what was inside Jeffrey Epstein's Florida mansion in 2005

New video shows Epstein's Florida mansion

Newly revealed police video takes us inside Jeffrey Epstein's Florida mansion. The video comes from a 2005 investigation of Epstein's relationships with underage girls. The footage shows what appears to be the ground floor of Epstein's home, the upstairs and pool area.

Epstein's Palm Beach house is just one of the locations where many of his alleged victims said they were abused.

The video shows armed police enter the home. According to CBS West Palm Beach affiliate WPEC-TV, police are seen reading a search warrant to Epstein's house manager.

Upstairs, there is a photo of what appears to be Epstein's ex-girlfriend, Ghislaine Maxwell. She has been accused of recruiting underage girls for Epstein. Maxwell has not been charged and denies any wrongdoing.

There is also a photo of what appears to be a gray-haired man and a brunette woman in the White House press briefing room. CBS News is unable to authenticate the photo. Our affiliate reports there are also nude photos of women throughout the house.

Three years after the video was taken, Epstein was convicted of child prostitution and served 13 months in jail.

On Tuesday, 23 women who say Epstein abused them told their stories to a judge during a hearing in New York.

"It's pretty upsetting to see how many lives he's devastated," Epstein accuser Chauntae Davies said. "It makes me sick to my stomach that there's perpetrators out there that obviously helped him in many ways for a very long time and they're still out there with no punishment."

In court, Davies and other accusers took aim at Epstein's alleged accomplices. Davies claims she was introduced to Epstein by Maxwell. Accuser Virginia Roberts Giuffre also said she was recruited by Maxwell and that "the reckoning must not end."

According to the New York City Medical Examiner's Office, Epstein hanged himself earlier this month while facing new criminal charges of sex trafficking. A federal judge is now expected to dismiss the criminal case against the disgraced financier.

"Jeffrey Epstein's death, whether it was a suicide or murder, does not end the case, does not end their fight for justice," said attorney Gloria Allred, who represents multiple Epstein accusers.

Epstein's attorneys said they also want answers after questioning the medical examiner's finding that Epstein died by hanging himself. The lawyers said the report is inadequate.

They believe the broken bones in Epstein's neck are more consistent with assault and homicide.