More Signs Of Media Merge

(CBS/iStockphoto)
In an announcement this morning, CBS News said it will become the first network to simulcast its evening news broadcast on the Internet when the "CBS Evening News with Katie Couric" debuts next month. According to a news release, the broadcast can be seen live online or be viewed at any time afterwards as an on-demand program. CBS News President Sean McManus said:
This is a groundbreaking development in making the program available to the largest possible audience. For people who can't be in front of their televisions when the "Evening News" is on, they can now watch the program live on their computers. It's another giant step towards providing CBS News content to people wherever they are – in their homes, in their offices, in their cars, on their computers or on their cell phones.
It sounds bold, but it is really just reflective of what's happening all across the media landscape (you can read more about how the simulcast works at TVNewser). For example, Broadcasting & Cable's Allison Romano takes a look at the increasing trend of newspapers getting into the online video game:
As interest in online video surges, newspapers are taking the fight to TV stations on the Web. Across the country, newspapers, suffering from declining readerships, are ratcheting up their online offerings, launching video pages and Webcasts. In Wilmington, Del., part of the Philadelphia market, The News Journal Webcasts daily morning and evening local news. Midsize and larger papers, including The New York Times and Atlanta Journal-Constitution, are training reporters to shoot video and hiring videographers and "multimedia" journalists like Spidle. The Associated Press provides video clips for more than 1,100 newspapers' Websites.
Clearly, video (both news and otherwise) is moving at least partly online at a rapid pace. Here are my questions for you, dear readers: Do you watch video online, on your cell phones or anywhere else than on your television sets? Will you watch an evening news broadcast online? What else do you want from your online, on-demand video? And what am I supposed to do with that big-screen, HD-TV I bought anyway?

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