Mideast Violence Brings Terror At Home

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Dearborn pediatrician Lobna Fakih spent a trying day caring for other kids, while her own three sons and husband were fleeing Beirut searching for sanctuary.
CBS
These are just a few of the faces of the estimated ten thousand Dearborn residents who went to Lebanon on vacation and wound up in a war.

"I have not yet spoken to anybody who doesn't have somebody over there right now," says Dearborn resident Rana Abbas-Chami.

"This is my sister, Noel. She is there with her two young daughters."

Seven members of Issam Abbas's family were at the Beirut airport trying to get out when it was bombed. Now they're trapped, and he's terrified, reports CBS News correspondent Cynthia Bowers.

"Everything is escalating so quickly it doesn't give you time to breathe to react to one thing before something else happens," says Issam.

Sister in law Rana relies on the occasional text message from her husband telling her he is still okay, but his words are hardly reassuring, "he said well they just destroyed all the area around our house all the houses and roads."

Abed and Mona Hammoud admit they feel helpless-their young sons caught up in the conflict. Today a CBS News crew found them holed up in their grandparents' Beirut apartment playing war games while the real thing raged around them.

"We woke up at three o'clock and we heard what I think was a fighter going supersonic, or they were bombing the airport again. So we turned on the news and as usual, there were people all wounded and we saw fires raging," says Mustafa Hammoud.

They take comfort knowing their children are safe today.

"I'm looking forward to seeing them on TV tonight but I'm still fearful for what's gonna happen next," says Hammoud.

But they know without a ceasefire there is constant danger.

"With every time I hear on news about bombs going down i pray to god that it's gonna miss, miss my family," says Mona Hammoud.

Dearborn pediatrician Lobna Fakih spent a trying day caring for other kids, while her own three sons and husband were fleeing Beirut searching for sanctuary.

So he called them and said he's in Syria now.

Though it's good news for her family, she is not happy.

"This hits home because it's my own, but you know what everyone has to stand together," says Lobna Fakih.

Because for every loved one who makes it to safety, there are thousands more still caught in the crossfire.