McCain Campaign Manager, In Fundraising Appeal, Calls Obama "Reckless"

John McCain's campaign manager, Rick Davis, has sent out a fundraising appeal that hits the theme McCain has been hammering over the past few days: That Obama's stated willingness "to sit down for an unconditional, face-to-face meeting with the leader of Iran is simply reckless."

"It would be a wonderful thing if we lived in a world without enemies," Davis writes. "But that's not the world in which we live, and until Senator Obama understands that reality, the American people have every reason to doubt whether he has the strength, judgment and determination to keep us safe."

Davis closes out the memo with a request for donations: " John McCain believes we need change in America, but not the kind of change that wins kind words from Hamas, surrenders in Iraq, or will hold unconditional talks with Iranian president Ahmadinejad. If you agree, please support our campaign for John McCain to become your next president by making a donation of $50, $100, $250, $500, $1,000, or up to the legal limit of $2,300."

Full memo below:

My Friends,

Last week, Senator Obama made a few comments I would like to respond to. Senator Obama claimed that all John McCain has to offer is a naive and irresponsible belief that tough talk would cause Iran to give up their nuclear program. He should have known better.

I have some news for Senator Obama: Simply talking, even with soaring rhetoric, will not convince Iran to give up its nuclear program. And for the president of the United States to sit down for an unconditional, face-to-face meeting with the leader of Iran is simply reckless.

John McCain has made it very clear that we will not negotiate with terrorist organizations. By conducting a presidential meeting with the leader of Iran - the world's largest state sponsor of terrorism - as Senator Obama wants to do, we would legitimize a regime that is dedicated to the extinction of Israel and is responsible for the death of brave young Americans.

And it doesn't stop with Iran. Barack Obama has said he would sit down, unconditionally, with the leaders of oppressive regimes around the world. Today, as many celebrate Cuban Independence Day, we are reminded how the Cuban people continue to live under tyranny on that imprisoned island. The Castro regime, for decades under Fidel and now under his brother Raul, enforces strict limits against freedom of expression, association, assembly, movement and speech. This regime led by Raul oppresses its people and regularly flaunts its hatred of the United States. Yet, Barack Obama said he would sit down, unconditionally, with Raul Castro.

It would be a wonderful thing if we lived in a world without enemies. But that's not the world in which we live, and until Senator Obama understands that reality, the American people have every reason to doubt whether he has the strength, judgment and determination to keep us safe.

That doubt is also manifested in Senator Obama's position on the war in Iraq, a topic on the mind of every American.

Senator Obama has said that if elected he will withdraw American troops from Iraq quickly, regardless of the situation on the ground and no matter what U.S. military commanders advise. Frankly, his position is irresponsible and again raises questions to his judgment and preparedness to be commander in chief.

If we withdraw prematurely from Iraq, Al Qaeda in Iraq will survive, claim victory and continue to provoke sectarian tensions. Iraq could easily descend into genocide and destabilize the entire region as neighboring powers come to the aid of various factions.

A reckless and premature withdrawal would be a terrible defeat for our security interests and our values. Iran - the world's chief state supporter of terrorism, a country with nuclear ambitions and a regime with the stated desire to destroy the state of Israel - will view our withdrawal as a victory and will see its influence in the Middle East grow significantly. The consequences of our defeat will threaten us for years.

Those who argue for premature withdrawal, as Senator Obama and Senator Clinton do, are arguing for a course that will eventually draw us into a wider and more difficult war that will entail far greater dangers and consequences for years to come.

John McCain believes we need change in America, but not the kind of change that wins kind words from Hamas, surrenders in Iraq, or will hold unconditional talks with Iranian president Ahmadinejad. If you agree, please support our campaign for John McCain to become your next president by making a donation of $50, $100, $250, $500, $1,000, or up to the legal limit of $2,300.

Thank you,

Rick Davis
Campaign Manager