Live

Watch CBSN Live

Mass tarantula migration expected to crawl through Colorado starting this month

Many American families may be taking their summer vacations at the end of August — and so are thousands of tarantulas, which will crawl toward Colorado at the end of the month.

Every year, a mass migration of tarantulas shows up in southeast Colorado, according to the Gazette. Most of the hairy spiders are male "Oklahoma brown" tarantulas, looking for female tarantulas that burrow in Colorado prairies. The group usually make its trek from late August to early October.

gettyimages-459566208.jpg
The tarantulas will be making their migration between the end of August and beginning of October. September 10 is the peak viewing day, according to Colorado's tourism board. Getty

While some might shudder in fear of the giant arachnids, the Colorado tourism board puts together a list of viewing tips, for the brave soles who choose to get close. Experts say the peak viewing day will be Sept. 10 at 6 p.m. Comanche National Grassland, south of La Junta, is a prime location to spot the critters.

Tarantulas may be creepy, but they're mostly harmless to humans, some of whom keep them as pets. However, these gargantuan insects can still deliver a powerful bite or fling their hairs as a defense mechanism. Their hairs can irritate human eyes, nose and mouth, sometimes requiring medical attention is required.

For those who are looking to steer clear of these nomads, there is one thing to keep in mind: tarantulas run even faster when it's hot out, according to a 2015 study. Scientists tested Texas brown spiders and found they run slower in colder temperatures — though they have more coordination than when it's hot out.

The spiders still moved about four body lengths a second on average when it was 62 F, and about 10 body lengths a second when it was 100 F — that's incredibly fast. 

Arachnophobes in Colorado aren't the only people who may have anxiety about the oncoming infestation. Tarantulas also converge on Southern California at the end of the summer.   

View CBS News In