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Long Island serial killer? "Not natural" items found in latest police searches

Emergency personnel search the thick brush on the side of the road near Oak Beach, N.Y., Monday, April 4, 2011. Searchers perched in fire truck bucket ladders Monday scanned dense, tick-infested undergrowth Monday in a search for more victims of a possible serial killer near where five sets of human remains have been found.
AP Photo/Seth Wenig
Long Island serial killer? "Not natural" items found in latest police searches
Police search the thick brush on the side of the road near Oak Beach, N.Y.
AP Photo/Seth Wenig

(CBS/WCBS) - The search for bodies on beaches on New York's Long Island continued Thursday, including teams on land, sea and air, as police say they are investigating items that are "not natural." 

Pictures: Long Island serial killer's victims?

"The Aviation Bureau has identified a significant number of items that are not natural to that area," said Nassau County Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter, reports CBS station WCBS.

Police said the items were found at Tobay Beach in Nassau county and they did not yet know if they were human remains.

"It's unknown at this time. That's what were doing here today. We're going to clarify what those items are. What they are not are natural," said Krumpter.

An FBI helicopter equipped with high resolution imaging technology was employed to help ground crews focus on what police described as areas of interest, reports WCBS.

Crews have uncovered at least 10 sets of human remains along the coastline in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties, including a skull, the bones of a toddler and the remains of four missing prostitutes.

About six New York State police officers were also assisting in the ground search Thursday.

Law enforcement sources told CBS News there may be two patterns and two killers, perhaps separating the first four and last six sets of remains that were found.

"I'm not going to get into names for obvious reasons but we are doing a lot of interviews," said Suffolk County Police Commissioner Richard Dormer.

While there are no active suspects at this time, authorities tell CBS News the presumed serial killer is likely white, between 25 and 40, intelligent and street-smart.

The remains of the other six victims are being tested for DNA in an attempt to identify them. If and when they are identified, investigators will try to locate family members for more information about the victims' backgrounds with the hope that it will lead them to the victims' killer.

Complete Coverage of the possible Long Island serial killer on Crimesider