Kelly Rowland on motherhood book "Whoa, Baby!"

Five-time Grammy winner Kelly Rowland shot to fame in the late '90s as a member of Destiny's Child. Since then, Rowland has pursued a solo career and added actress and mother to her resume. Rowland is now the author of a new book she co-wrote with her obstetrician, "Whoa, Baby!: A Guide for New Moms Who Feel Overwhelmed and Freaked Out."

"I wanted it to be everything I felt like I needed after I had my son and I wanted it to be completely black and white, no gray area," Rowland said Wednesday on "CBS This Morning." 

One of the chapters she became "obsessed" with was on a topic she personally struggled with the most at the start of motherhood: breastfeeding. 

"I saw so many women do it, you know, whether it was in public or you saw them do it in hospital rooms, and you saw it on movies. It looked so beautiful and glamorous, and I was so excited about it, and it was one that I really struggled with," Rowland said.

She added, "It didn't last really long for me. My supply was short, and I remember I felt it put a lot of pressure on myself because I couldn't supply as much as I wanted to and I had to supplement."

Another area of insecurity for many new mothers is getting their body back in shape post-pregnancy.

"Someone told me in that time, they were like, it took a child nine months to form in your body. Give yourself some time." Rowland said.

Rowland recently posted an Instagram photo of herself in a bikini – with stretch marks.

"B!T@H BE HUMBLE" -@KendrickLamar

A post shared by Kelly Rowland (@kellyrowland) on

When asked why, she said, "A lot of women are like, oh my God, I just don't want to see stretch marks and I have stretch marks. It's something that we usually kind of fight with within ourselves, and I just wanted to bring light to it and just let women know we all have them."

The part of the book that she is most proud of is the one on postpartum depression.

"I'm so happy that more moms, different celeb moms are opening up and talking about it because it opens up room for dialogue and it opens up room for communication and us to be able to feel comfortable to where if there are any signs we're able to say, you know what? Am I weird or this for feeling bad? No, let's talk about it and let's get somebody involved," Rowland said.