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It's Men's Health Week

As air fares skyrocket and the economy falters, some Americans are choosing to drive to their vacation destinations. Sue Perry, Deputy Editor of ShopSmart Magazine, has some advice for making the trip as seamless as possible.
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Across the country, men are taking part in health screenings, road races, workplace health programs and more to mark Men's Health Week. Members of Congress will lead the way, by attending the sixth annual Congressional Men's Health screenings at the Capitol.

The effort is needed, says Dr. David Gremillion of the Men's Health Network because "men are socialized, I believe, from the earliest ages to avoid appearing weak and vulnerable. As a result, we often ignore the aches and pains that would get us early signs to disease. Subsequently, we present later and at a more complicated stage of illness."

Congress created the national Men's Health Week in 1994 through the Men's Health Network for the purpose of raising awareness of men's health issues. It's the week leading up to and including Father's Day and is designed to encourage all men to take charge of their health and seek preventive health services.

Dr. Gremillion visited The Early Show Monday to explain the need for men to be checked regularly by a doctor for a variety of health issues.

And he says women play an important role in getting the men in their lives to seek health care and preventive services says Dr. Gremillion.

His advice to women?

"First of all, women need to avoid appearing too pushy. Certainly, it's valuable to be encouraging, in a loving sort of way, to give men permission to go to the doctor," he says.

Prostate cancer screening is important for men to have Dr. Gremillion says; he notes prostate cancer is the leading cause of death in men. But also he recommends blood pressure checks and blood sugar checks among other things.