Hilton's New Passion: Helping Inmates

Paris Hilton's booking photo, c/o L.A. Co. Sheriffs Department
L.A. Co. Sheriffs Department
In the second part of her exclusive interview with Ryan Seacrest, Paris Hilton said she plans to build a "transitional home" to aid inmates after they've completed their time in jail.

The heiress also said that she plans to start a new life when she leaves Century Regional Detention Center.

She told Seacrest in a collect call from jail that the average inmate returns to jail an average of seven times. "These women just keep coming back because they have no place to go," she said.

Hilton said the home she plans to build will be "a place to get food and clothes on their backs."

She told Seacrest that she's really passionate about helping mothers get back on their feet after they complete their jail time.

Game: Dress Paris For Jail

"It's a really bad cycle and if we stop it now, we can make our community a better place," Hilton said.

Hilton told Seacrest she is excited to start a new life.

"I appreciate everything now and I think there was a lot of bad people that I was around and I don't want to surround myself with those types of people anymore," she said.

The second part of Seacrest's interview with Hilton airs on Friday evening between 7-10 p.m.

In the first part of her exclusive interview, which aired on Seacrest's show on Thursday, Hilton said jail has changed her.

"I'm so much more grateful for everything that I have, even just to have a pillow at night or food," Hilton said. "You know my gratitude has gone up so much and I just realize that the media used me to make fun of and be mean about it."

Hilton went on to say that she is "frankly sick of it and I want to use my fame in a good way."

Family visits have been difficult for Hilton, who is in jail after failing a sobriety test and twice violating her probation by driving on a suspended sentence.

"I am behind glass and I want to give my dad a big hug and they won't even let me do that," she said.

Her treatment during visiting hours demonstrates that she's not getting any special treatment, Hilton claimed.

"That's how the rules are, you have to be behind glass ... I'm not a criminal, I'm not dangerous, so it makes me feel like that," she said. "It's hard but I'm stronger everyday."

Hilton is expected to be released June 25 after serving 23 days of her 45-day sentence.