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High Heat's Thanksgiving Meal

Chef Waldy Malouf cooks up a delicious Thanksgiving Day feast for The Early Show. He shares a few of his family's favorite recipes, which can be found in his latest cookbook, "High Heat."

Malouf is the chef and co-owner of Beacon Restaurant in New York City. His first cookbook, "The Hudson River Valley Cookbook," was nominated for an IACP/Julia Child cookbook award.

Roasting and grilling are signature cooking methods for Chef Malouf. Try out his recipes.

Menu:
Click on each item below to get the recipe
Roasted Butternut Squash and Pear Soup
Brined Turkey with Pan Gravy
Chestnut Apple Stuffing
Cornbread, Oyster, and Tarragon Stuffing
Cranberry, Pecan, and Citrus Relish
Old-Fashioned Mashed Potatoes
Sweet Potatoes with Spicy Maple Syrup
Toasted Brussel Sprouts with Bacon
Roasted Apple and Cheddar Cheese Pie

Roasted Butternut Squash and Pear Soup
Excerpted from "High Heat," Broadway Books, May 2003
By Waldy Malouf and Melissa Clark

Perfectly autumnal with the rich dense texture of butternut squash complemented by the lightness of pear, this creamy broth features two fruits of the fall. Although you might think that the pear, squash, and crystallized ginger would make for a pretty sweet soup, dry white wine and spicy fresh ginger temper this tendency. Instead ,the flavors are savory and mellow with a hint of spices, while the garnish of candied ginger adds just the right spark.

Serves 6 to 8

1 large butternut squash (about 3 pounds), peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch pieces
2 carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Coarse sea salt or kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned and sliced
2 Bosc pears, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup brandy
7 cups chicken or vegetable broth (low-sodium if canned) or water
1 large sprig fresh thyme plus additional leaves for garnish
1-inch piece ginger root, peeled and grated
1/4 cup crème fraiche or sour cream, for garnish (optional)
1 tablespoon chopped crystallized ginger, for garnish

  1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Place the squash and carrots in a roasting pan large enough to hold them in one layer (or use 2), and toss with the oil and salt and pepper. Roast for 10 minutes, then add the leeks and pears. Toss to combine and continue to roast for another 30 minutes, until the vegetables are tender and browned.
  2. Remove the pan from the oven and immediately add the wine and brandy, using a wooden spoon to scrape the vegetables and their caramelized juices from the sides and bottom of the pan. Transfer the vegetables and liquid to a large soup pot. Pour in the broth or water-adding additional water if necessary to cover the vegetables by 1 inch. Add the thyme sprig and grated ginger root and bring the liquid to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, partially covered, for 1 hour.
  3. Remove the thyme sprig and puree the soup either with an immersion blender, or in batches in a blender or food processor. Transfer the soup to a medium mesh sieve set over another pot. Use a rubber spatula to press the solids through the sieve. If the soup seems too thick, thin it with a little water. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Just before serving, warm the soup over low heat. Serve in warmed bowls, drizzled with crème fraiche or sour cream, if desired, and garnished with the crystallized ginger and a sprinkling of fresh thyme leaves.

Brined Turkey With Pan Gravy
Chef Waldy Malouf's
Serves 8 -10 (with leftovers)

A 14-20 pound Turkey (Preferably Organically Grown, Order 1-2 weeks in advance, Pick up on Monday)

For the brine (MONDAY)

1 gallon water
1 cup sugar
1 cup kosher salt
1 bunch fresh sage
1 bunch fresh thyme
3 tablespoons cracked black pepper

  • Bring all ingredients to boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Chill overnight.

For the turkey stock (TUESDAY)

2 turkey wings, neck, giblets and other trimmings
1 onion, sliced
1 stalk celery, sliced
1 carrot, sliced
2 cloves garlic, sliced
Coarse salt and fresh ground pepper
4 cups chicken stock

  • Preheat the oven to 400° F.
    Cut off the two end pieces off each turkey wing, put them and the additional turkey trimmings in a roasting pan. Roast until the skin is well browned, 45 minutes to an hour. Place turkey pieces in soup pot. Add the giblets (except the liver) and neck to soup pot. Add the sliced vegetables, a teaspoon of salt and several grinds of pepper to the pot.
  • Add chicken stock and enough cold water to cover the meat and vegetables, bring to a boil and simmer stock over medium low heat, partially covered for 3 hours. Strain stock, reserving giblets and refrigerate. You should have 6 cups of stock.

Brine the turkey (TUESDAY)
In a container large enough to hold the turkey double two large heavy-duty garbage bags (not treated with pesticides). Place turkey in bags and add brine. Cinch up sides of the bags and tightly tie the top. The brine should be all around the bird. Refrigerate turkey. If it doesn't fit - use an ice chest, cover and surround the bird with ice. Replenish ice as needed until Thursday.

THANKSGIVING DAY: For the Turkey and Gravy

1 onion, sliced
4 stalks celery, sliced
2 carrots, sliced
Coarse salt and ground pepper
6 cups turkey stock
1 cup dry white wine
3 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons flour
1 bunch fresh sage and grapes for garnish

  • About 5 hours before serving, remove turkey from brine and rinse with fresh cold water. Dry with paper towels. Season with salt and ground pepper. Fill body and neck cavity loosely with your favorite stuffing. Truss bird with butcher's twine. Spread sliced vegetables over the bottom of a roasting pan and lay turkey on top. Remove fat layer from top of stock and add a cup of stock to roasting pan. Heat remaining stock in a sauce pan.
  • About 4 hours before serving, preheat oven to 400°F. Place turkey in oven and roast for 1 1/2 hours.
  • Turn oven temperature down to 325°F. Tent the breast loosely with foil. Add a little stock to moisten vegetables in roasting pan if they are browning too fast. Roast turkey for another 1-1/2 hours or until the internal temperature of the thigh is 165°F and juices run clear. Turn oven off and transfer turkey to a platter and return it to oven to rest.
  • While the turkey is resting, strain roasting pan juices into simmering stock, reserve vegetables. Use a little of the stock to deglaze the roasting pan and return liquid to sauce pan. Chop or grind giblets very fine.
  • Melt butter in a sauté pan and add the vegetables from the roasting pan. Sprinkle with the flour and stir to combine. Cook the mixture over medium heat, stirring frequently, until it is very thick and brown. Add wine, blend thoroughly and cook, stirring frequently until wine is mostly evaporated. Add half of the stock to the sauté pan, stir well and pour thickened stock back into the sauce pan. Simmer for 10 minutes. Strain the sauce into another saucepan and simmer it gently for another 20 minutes. Remove turkey from oven, pour any juices into sauce, add giblets to the sauce and simmer 5 more minutes. Taste and season sauce. Garnish the turkey with sage and clusters of grapes.

Chestnut-Apple Stuffing
Adapted from The Hudson River Valley Cookbook

Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds chestnuts, to yield 1 1/2 cups chestnut meats
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped onion
2 cloves chopped garlic
1/2 cup brandy
4 cups chicken broth
One 15-ounce package unseasoned bread for stuffing, or 1 pound stale white bread, cut in 1/4ch cubes
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1 tablespoon chopped thyme leaves
1 cup cranberries, chopped coarse
2 extra-large eggs
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
    Roast and shell the chestnuts. Cut an X on the flat side of the shell of each chestnut,. Put the nuts in a single layer in a roasting pan and roast for 45 minutes. Take the nuts out of the oven and, as soon as you can handle them, peel them. Keep the pan covered while you work: if the chestnuts cool, the bitter skin will adhere to the chestnut meat and the chestnuts will be very difficult to peel. Rough chop the chestnuts.
    Generously butter a shallow 3-quart serving casserole or a 9-by-13-inch baking pan.
  2. Melt 4 tablespoons of the butter in a large sauté pan and cook the celery, onion, garlic, and shallots over medium heat until wilted. Add the chestnuts and cook for 5 minutes more to brown the nuts a little. Add the brandy and 1 cup of the stock until the liquid has almost evaporated.
  3. Put the bread in a very large bowl. Add the parsley, thyme, cranberries, and chestnut mixture. Break in the eggs and add the cream and the remaining 3 cups stock. Using your hands, combine everything thoroughly. Season liberally with salt and pepper. Spread the stuffing mixture evenly in the buttered casserole, dot with the remaining butter, and cover with foil. You can prepare the stuffing up to this point a day in advance. If you do so, remove it from the refrigerator 4 hours before serving time.
  4. If you want to cook the stuffing separately, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Put the stuffing in the oven and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake about 20 minutes more, until the stuffing is firm and a light crust has formed.
  5. If you are cooking the stuffing with the turkey, remover the foil, put it, uncovered, in the oven when you turn the temperature down to 325 degrees and leave it in the oven until the turkey is carved.

Cornbread, Oyster, & Tarragon Stuffing
By: Waldy Malouf

Ingredients
2 pints shucked oysters with their liquor
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped onion
2 cloves chopped garlic
1/2 cup brandy
3 cups chicken broth
One 15-ounce package unseasoned cornbread for stuffing, or 1 pound stale white bread, cut in 1/4-inch cubes
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1 tablespoon chopped thyme leaves
1 cup cranberries, chopped coarse
2 extra-large eggs
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
    Generously butter a shallow 3-quart serving casserole or a 9-by-13-inch baking pan.
  2. Melt 4 tablespoons of the butter in a large sauté pan and cook the celery, onion, garlic, and shallots over medium heat until wilted. Add the brandy and 1 cup of the stock and simmer until the liquid has almost evaporated. Add the oysters and cook for another 2 minutes.
  3. Put the bread in a very large bowl. Add the parsley, thyme, and tarragon. Break in the eggs and add the cream and the remaining 3 cups stock. Using your hands, combine everything thoroughly. Season liberally with salt and pepper. Spread the stuffing mixture evenly in the battered casserole, dot with the remaining butter, and cover with foil. You can prepare the stuffing up to this point a day in advance. If you do so, remove it from the refrigerator 4 hours before serving time.
  4. If you want to cook the stuffing separately, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Put the stuffing in the oven and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake about 20 minutes more, until the stuffing is firm and a light crust has formed.

Cranberry, Pecan, & Citrus Relish
Adapted from The Hudson River Valley Cookbook

Ingredients
1 navel orange
1 lemon
1 lime
1/2 cup shelled pecans
3 cups fresh cranberries
1/2 cup Grand Marnier or other orange-flavored liqueur
1 cup sugar

Method:

  1. Using a zester or a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored part only-no white) from the orange, lemon, and lime and cut into 1 1/2-inch-long julienne strips. Sweat the peel next to the stove.
  2. Slice off the bottom and top ends of the fruit and cut off the white pith and the membrane. Holding the orange in your hand over a bowl, insert a sharp knife between the segments, cutting the flesh of the fruit from the membrane. Allow the flesh of the orange to fall into the bowl and squeeze out any juice remaining in the membrane. Discard the membrane. Repeat the process with the lemon and lime, removing all seeds as you proceed. Set the bowl of fruit next to the stove. Rough chop the nuts and place them next to the stove. Wash the cranberries and have the Grand Marnier at hand.
  3. Caramelize the sugar. Put the sugar in a heavy-bottomed 2-quart saucepan and, stirring with a wooden spoon, melt it over medium heat. Let it continue to cook until it is completely dissolved and has become a clear amber syrup. This will take 3-4 minutes. Be careful not to let the sugar get too dark. As soon as it is ready, quickly add the nuts and roast them in the caramel for a minute or two, until the nuts darken a bit and the sugar foams. Add the zest and stir consistently for 30 seconds. Add the cranberries and let the mixture cook, stirring from time to time, until it has a jamlike consistency and most of the =cranberries are broken, 11 to 12 minutes. Turn off the heat and stir in the Grand Marnier. Let the relish cool and refrigerate it, covered. Serve at room temperature.
  4. This relish will keep up to one week in the refrigerator.

Old-Fashioned Mashed Potatoes
Adapted from The Hudson River Valley Cookbook

Ingredients
2 1/2 pounds baking potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks.
Coarse salt & freshly ground pepper
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
1/4 cup heavy cream

Method:

  1. Boil the potatoes in plenty of lightly salted water until they are tender throughout when pierced with a sharp fork or knife point. Drain the potatoes well and put them through a ricer or a food mill or press them with a sieve. Do not puree the potatoes in a food processor-they will become gooey.
  2. Working the potatoes as little as possible and using a wooden spoon or a rubber spatula, beat in the butter and the cream and season the potatoes to taste with salt and freshly ground pepper. Serve immediately or set aside and reheat in a casserole in a 350 degree oven.
  3. This recipe for mashed potatoes can be varied endlessly.

Sweet Potatoes with Spicy Maple Syrup

Ingredients
4 lb sweet potatoes peeled and cut into large 1"x1' squares
1 1/2 cups maple syrup, diluted with 1 1/2 cups water
2 teaspoons dry red pepper flakes
4 tablespoons butter
coarse salt & freshly ground pepper

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
    In a small saucepan, bring the diluted maple syrup and red pepper flakes to a boil; simmer for 3-4 minutes. After it has simmered, add the butter to syrup.
  2. Place the sweet potatoes in a shallow casserole so that they are about 2" deep. Season with salt & pepper. Pour the maple syrup mixture over the sweet potatoes. Bake the sweet potatoes for 45 minutes, or until they are tender and lightly browned.

Toasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon
Excerpted from "High Heat," Broadway Books, May 2003
By Waldy Malouf and Melissa Clark

As I like to point out, bacon is great on everything. In this case, it has a good shot at converting people who tell you they hate Brussels sprouts. Roasting the sprouts endows them with sweet, soft centers and crisp outer leaves, and tossing them with crunchy bits of bacon makes them a great savory side dish for fall or winter meals. Serve this at Thanksgiving, or with roast chicken. If you can find Brussels sprouts on the stalk, which you cut off yourself, they're funny looking but will insure you of fresh, sweet tasting sprouts.

Serves 4 to 6

1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts (about 5 cups)
4 slices bacon
Coarse sea salt or kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

  1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. or light the grill. Trim the Brussels sprouts and score the bottoms with an 'X.'
  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook the Brussels sprouts until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Drain.
  3. In a skillet, cook the bacon until crisp, then transfer it to a paper towel-lined plate. Reserve half of the bacon fat.
  4. In the Oven-Transfer the Brussels sprouts to a large casserole and roast for 5 minutes. Pour the reserved bacon fat over the Brussels sprouts, season with salt and pepper and add 2 tablespoons of water. Toss well, and roast until tender, about another 15 minutes.
  5. On the Grill-When the Brussels sprouts are cool enough to handle, halve them and place them in a large bowl. Add the reserved bacon fat, season with salt and pepper, and toss well. Transfer to a large grill basket and grill, turning once, until tender and lightly browned, about 10 minutes.
  6. Transfer the Brussels sprouts to a bowl. Dice the reserved bacon, sprinkle it over the Brussels sprouts, and serve.

Roasted Apple and Cheddar Cheese Pie
Excerpted from "High Heat," Broadway Books, May 2003
By Waldy Malouf and Melissa Clark

Roasting the apples is a great solution to the problems of a soggy bottom crust and the gap between the fruit and the top crust inherent in most apple pies.

Makes one 9-inch pie

1 3/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt or kosher salt
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
1 3/4 cups grated sharp good quality cheddar cheese (about 7 ounces), plus additional slices for serving, if desired
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 pounds Granny Smith apples (5 or 6 large), peeled and cored
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup dark brown sugar, packed
Juice of 1/2 a lemon
1/2 vanilla bean, split lengthwise

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, pulse 1 3/4 cups of the flour with 1/2 teaspoon of the salt. Add the butter and pulse three to four times until the mixture has the consistency of oatmeal. Add 1 cup of the cheese and pulse to distribute. Do not over-process, it should not be smooth. Transfer to a bowl. Make a well in the flour mixture and add the egg. Use a fork to stir the egg into the flour mixture, then sprinkle the dough with up to 3 tablespoons of water (add them one at a time), using as little as needed to form the dough into a mass. Divide the dough in half and pat each half into a disk. Place one disk in a pie plate and use your fingers to pat it to line the pan. Place the other disk between two sheets of waxed paper and use a rolling pin to roll the dough into a 10-inch circle. Refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour, well wrapped (or freeze for up to 2 months). Remove the pie dough from the refrigerator 15 minutes before baking.
  2. Preheat the broiler.
  3. Slice each apple into 8 wedges and place them in a bowl. Sprinkle the granulated sugar over them and toss to coat. Spread the apples in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet and broil for 5 to 7 minutes, turning once. The apples should be caramelized and golden brown.
  4. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Place the apples in a bowl with the brown sugar, lemon juice, remaining 1/4 teaspoon of salt, the remaining 2 tablespoons of flour and remaining 3/4 cup of cheese. Fill the bottom crust with the apples and brush the rim with water. Cover with the top crust, trim to create an even border, then roll to form a crust and crimp the edges together. Cut 4 slits into the top crust to allow steam to escape and place the pie on a baking sheet on the bottom shelf of the oven. Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until the juices are bubbling and the fruit is tender (you can gauge the firmness of the fruit by sliding a thin knife through the opening in the crust and piercing the fruit). If the crust browns before the apples are cooked, loosely cover the pie with aluminum foil). Let sit for at least 30 minutes before serving warm, with extra cheese if desired.



Note: A small group of farmers and conservationists are reviving heritage turkeys. With the marketing support of Slow Food USA, about 30 farmers nationwide are raising varieties such as the Narragansett, Standard Bronze, Black and Bourbon Red. The familiar Broadbreasted White, bred for its prodigious quantity of white meat and its ability to grow quickly to enormous size, is all that's been available to most of us. Allowed to grow older than these commercial birds, heritage turkeys put on an extra layer of fat. Proponents say this gives them deeper flavor and that exercise gives them firmer texture. Heritage turkey breeding programs are so new, and the orders are required so far in advance (when you order one, it's basically custom-raised for you), that only a few thousand birds are available to restaurants or home cooks throughout the country each year.