Clooney on Amal proposal: "I literally dropped it on her"

Atop the One World Trade Center, the Oscar-winning actor shares how both professionally and personally, he is on top of the world, reports "CBS This Morning" co-host Charlie Rose.

Few things can take George Clooney's breath away, but seeing the view from the new One World Observatory is not an average experience. At 100 floors up, you can see for miles in every direction.

Clooney grew up in the South, but said he loves New York.

"I think it's -- you could make arguments for a lot of the great cities around the world, but I think New York is the most unique. I think it's the best city in the world," Clooney said.

Right now, for Clooney, home is wherever Amal is, his beautiful bride of seven months.

"It happened pretty quickly. I knew fairly quickly that I wanted to spend the rest of my life with Amal. But, you know, I have to say, when I asked her, you know, we had never talked about it. So it was all, there was, you know, there wasn't, like, 'Hey, maybe we should get married.' I literally, I dropped it on her," he said.

He said he proposed in his home, to a playlist of some of his Aunt Rosemary songs.

"And I asked her. And she just kept saying, 'Oh my God' and 'Wow.' And we just sat there," he said.

She was taken completely by surprise.

"Finally, I just said, 'Listen.' You know, I'm 53, at the time, or 52, I think, at the time, and I said, 'You know, I've been on my knee now for about 28 minutes. So I gotta get an answer out of this, 'cause I'm gonna throw a hip out,'" Clooney said.

He said he's never been happier.

"I have someone who I can talk to about anything and someone who I care more about than I've cared about anybody," he said. "So it's really nice."

He said she's "a real decision maker" and it shouldn't be surprising that he married a woman smarter than he.

"The bar's fairly low. That wasn't so hard. But yeah, it was I must say it is very fun to be able to, you know, she's my spell checker too," Clooney said.

Clooney and Amal vowed to try and never spend a week apart -- a difficult task as George Clooney promotes his latest film, "Tomorrowland."

The sci-fi Disney film features far-off lands and futuristic robots, but it was the film's core message, written and directed by Brad Bird, that drew Clooney in.

"Brad's thought was that we've gotten away from the idea that each individual has the ability to change and shape the future and, that sort of the darkest parts of our future that we look at and see are not inevitable," Clooney said. "That there are things you can do to change it. And I love the idea I love the overarching themes of it."

"When I was growing up, we thought we'd be flyin' around in 'Jetson' cars by now, in bubbles, you know? And we feel as if we didn't sort of achieve half of those things," Clooney said.

Clooney is somewhat of a Hollywood triple threat. He's produced films like "Argo," starred in hits like "Ocean's 11" and in the case of "Monument's Men" he wrote, directed and acted.

How does he choose what he wants to do?

"Grant, who's my partner, and I, who's been my buddy for 30-some years ... We always thought 'Well, if we ever got the opportunity, we would just do the things we want to do.' And quite honestly, 'Good Night and Good Luck' was written, we wrote that because I was disturbed with our lack of accountability by the press as the son of a news man in asking the tough questions before we went to war," Clooney said.

In the future, Clooney said he'll probably move more behind the camera.

"I think that's just a natural progression for actors as they age. It's not much fun aging on camera," he said. "I'm much more interested in the process of filmmaking than I am necessarily being in front of the camera right now."