Daniel Schorr Covered World for 60 Years

One of the longest careers in broadcast journalism came to an end Friday. Veteran reporter and commentator Daniel Schorr died in Washington. He was 93.
One of the longest careers in broadcast journalism came to an end Friday. Veteran reporter and commentator Daniel Schorr died in Washington. He was 93.
CBS
One of the longest careers in broadcast journalism came to an end Friday. Veteran reporter and commentator Daniel Schorr died in Washington. He was 93.

Obituary: CBS News, NPR Veteran Daniel Schorr Dies at 93

Schorr had covered the world for more than 60 years, spending 24 of them at CBS News, "CBS Evening News" Anchor Katie Couric reports.

(Scroll down to watch Katie Couric's remembrance of Daniel Schorr)

Edward R. Murrow recruited Schorr to work for CBS in 1953. As a correspondent in Moscow, he persuaded Nikita Khrushchev to give CBS his first television interview. Later, Schorr became a member of the storied CBS News Washington Bureau.

"He had a great way of irritating government officials because he always came up with the truth," said CBS News Chief Washington Correspondent Bob Schieffer. "He came up with these stories. People couldn't figure out how he got it."

Schorr led CBS News coverage of the Watergate scandal. When he got a hold of President Nixon's infamous enemies list, he read it cold on live TV and was stunned to hear himself say, "Number 17, Schorr, Daniel … a real media enemy."

Born in the Bronx the son or Russian immigrants, Schorr was brilliant, brash and abrasive. He clashed not only with government officials but news management and left CBS in the uproar that followed his leaking of a congressional report about questionable activities by the CIA.

In 1979, Schorr joined the fledgling CNN and in the mid-'80s moved to NPR, where he worked until his death.

In his later years, he wrote, "Stormy as it was, I wouldn't trade my career for anyone else's."

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