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Condoleezza Rice photos found in Qaddafi's compound

Condoleezza Rice, Qaddafi, Libya
Rebel fighters look through an album they found inside Muammar Qaddafi's compound in Bab Al-Aziziya in Tripoli, Libya, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev

When Libyan rebels raided Muammar Qaddafi's compound in Tripoli this week, they ransacked the place, finding evidence of the strongman's wealth -- and his preoccupation with former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

The image above shows rebel fighters on Wednesday inspecting a photo album, with a series of pictures of Rice, found inside Qaddafi's compound, known as Bab Al-Aziziya.

Qaddafi's interest in Rice has been well documented. In a 2007 interview, as the Washington Post noted, Qaddafi called her "my darling black African woman."

"I admire and am very proud of the way she leans back and gives orders to the Arab leaders," he said, in what the Post described as a back-handed compliment. "She beckons to the Arab foreign ministers, and they come to her, either in groups or individually... Leezza, Leezza, Leezza... I love her very much. I admire her, and I'm proud of her, because she's a black woman of African origin."

Rice met with Qaddafi at his compound in 2008, making her the first U.S. secretary of state to visit the Libyan capital in more than five decades. For her part, Rice said the trip demonstrated "that the United States does not have permanent enemies."

The visit must have left an impression on Qaddafi because an official list of gifts the Bush administration received in 2008 showed that the Libyan leader gave Rice three items: a diamond ring in wood box, a "DVD with musical instrument," and a locket with Qaddafi's photo. The gifts, worth a combined total of $212,225, were sent to the General Services Administration, which takes most diplomatic gifts and puts them on display in government buildings.

Libya
Rebel fighter pose for a photo as he sit on a two seater couch that framed by golden mermaid with the face of Aisha Gadhafi the daughter of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi in her house in Tripoli, Libya, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. A defiant Moammar Gadhafi vowed Wednesday to fight on "until victory or martyrdom," as rebel fighters tried to end scattered attacks by regime loyalists in the nervous capital. AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev

As the Libyan rebels took control of parts of Tripoli, it made for a variety of interesting images. The rebels at left posed for a photo in a couch in the home of Qaddafi's daughter Aisha. The couch is framed by a golden mermaid with Aisha's face.

Below, rebel fighters shoot in the air as one man climbs atop the iconic statue of a golden fist gripping an American plane which stands outside Qaddafi's compound.

The rebels continued to battle forces loyal to Qaddafi for control of Tripoli on Thursday. CBS News correspondent Barry Petersen reports considerable gunfire around a series of buildings on the south side of Qaddafi's compound, and Reuters reports rebels claim to have surrounded Qaddafi or one of his sons inside.

Libya
Rebel fighters gesture and shoot in the air as they celebrate overrunning Moammar Gadhafi's compound Bab al-Aziziya in Tripoli, Libya, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. Hundreds of Libyan rebels stormed Gadhafi's compound Tuesday, charging wildly through the symbolic heart of the crumbling regime as they killed loyalist troops, looted armories and knocked the head off a statue of the besieged dictator. AP Photo/Francois Mori
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