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"World's most dangerous bird" that killed its Florida owner is up for auction

The large, flightless bird that killed its owner, 76-year-old Marvin Hajos, earlier this month is now up for auction in Florida. The public livestock auction scheduled for Saturday will hold bids for dozens of animals, including two of Hajos' cassowaries, which are considered to be the "world's most dangerous bird." 

The Gulf Coast Livestock Auction in Madison announced on Facebook they would proceed to sell Hajos' animals. The post read, "One of Marvin's wishes were his animals be sold at auction as soon as possible. This is an absolute auction and complete dispersal of his animal collection."  

An auction spokeswoman confirmed to CBS News that the cassowaries up for bids belonged to Hajos, and said they are "100 percent healthy."

The cassowary attacked Hajos, likely with its long claws on April 13 after he fell on his farm, authorities told CBS affiliate WGFL-TV. They later told the station the victim was apparently trying to retrieve an egg from the cassowaries' pen.

cassowary
This photo taken on August 23, 2017, shows a cassowary. Getty

Cassowaries, which are native to Australia and New Guinea, are similar to emus and stand up to 6 feet tall and weigh up to 130 pounds, with black body feathers and distinctive, bright blue heads and necks.

The San Diego Zoo's website called the cassowary the "world's most dangerous bird" with a 4-inch, "dagger-like" claw on each foot. The zoo says it is the second-heaviest bird in the world, after its cousin the ostrich. The bird can also jump nearly 7 feet up into the air, the zoo said.

"The cassowary can slice open any predator or potential threat with a single swift kick. Powerful legs help the cassowary run up to 31 miles per hour through the dense forest underbrush," the website said.

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