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Bring The Garden To Your Table

A U.S. military Black Hawk helicopter flies over the heavily fortified Green Zone in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Dec. 21, 2006. A bomb killed an American soldier and two other U.S. Army servicemen died from combat injuries Thursday in Iraq.
AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic
September is the perfect time of year to use your garden to accent your home. Georgia Raimondi, author of The Passionate Gardener, shared some tips on bringing the garden to your table on The Saturday Early Show.
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Use an inexpensive garden container and spray paint it with craft paint. In the center, plant a flower, such as a daisy, and around it, plant herbs that go with the menu. Use basil to accompany a fresh tomato salad or dill if you plan to serve fish and rosemary for lamb dishes. Guests can pinch off their favorite herb right at the table to season their meal.

Also, surplus vegetables from the garden can be artfully arranged in a basket for a summer centerpiece.

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Fill small clay or terra-cotta pots with moss and place a flower in bloom in the pot. Stick a small twig into the moss to hold the card in place.

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Use hosta leaves or those from any other large tropical plant to make a place mat. Place a brightly colored buffet plate on top of your leaf place mat. Sprinkle them with herbs and small flowers and install a clear glass dinner plate on top. Flat flowers work better than those with a thick center.

At each place setting, fill a small decorative bowl with water and float flowers inside. Sage, parsley and basil also work well. The result is a fragrant setting that also makes a great conversation starter.

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Cut a 12-inch stem of ivy, wrap it around a rolled napkin and tuck a flower inside. You can also use sprigs of rosemary to add scent.

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Place a large column candle in a terra-cotta plant saucer. Decorate by arranging flowers, foliage, ivy or berries around the base.

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Decorate the back of each guest's chair with black-eyed Susans and ornamental grasses tied with a ribbon. Spray the flowers with water to keep them fresh until the guests arrive.