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Books: "Daddy's Girl"

This is where you can get information about many of the books featured on The Early Show in March.

Wednesday, March 28, 2007

"Daddy's Girl," by Lisa Scottoline

Best-selling crime novelist Lisa Scottoline says she's on a mission to teach us about justice.

Her latest heroine, law professor Natalie Greco, tries to unravel a suspicious prison murder and her own tangled personal life in the new thriller, "Daddy's Girl."

Scottoline stopped by The Early Show Wednesday to talk about it.

To see the segment,

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To read an excerpt of "Daddy's Girl," click here.

For more on Scottoline, visit her Web site by clicking here.



Monday, March 26, 2007

"The Fiber35 Diet: Nature's Weight Loss Secret," by Brenda Watson and Leonard Smith

We often hear about people who lose weight and later gain it back, and more. But in a new book called "The Fiber 35 Diet: Nature's Weight Loss Secret," nutritionist Brenda Watson and Leonard Smith explain how eating more fiber can help you lose weight and keep it off.

Watson stopped by The Early Show to talk about it.

She says many books have been written about the benefits of fiber, but this may be the first to focus on the weight loss aspect.

Watson says she, herself, lost 35 pounds by upping her fiber intake.

"The biggest reason people fail on meal plans is they get hungry," she says. "One thing fiber does is keep you full and satisfied."

There are other things, of course, and Watson spells them out, as well.

To see the segment,

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To read an excerpt of "The Fiber 35 Diet," click here.

For more information on the book, click here.

"The Fiber 35 Diet" is published by Free Press, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, which is part of the CBS Corporation, as is CBSNews.com.



Thursday, March 22, 2007

"The Art of Friendship: 70 Simple Rules for Making Meaningful Connections," by Roger Horchow and Sally Horchow

Retail magnate Roger Horchow and his daughter, Sally Horchow, co-authored "The Art of Friendship," described by its Web site as "a stylish and elegant primer on making and maintaining authentic friendships throughout one's life." Seventy brief essays present what the site calls "simple but effective rules of connecting."

On The Early Show Thursday, Sally Horchow discussed the importance of occasionally reevaluating, or "spring cleaning" your friendships, that is, eliminating friendships that aren't working anymore, and doing it gracefully. In addition, Horchow says you should be careful about the new friendships you make.

To watch the segment,

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To read an excerpt of "The Art of Friendship" and visit the book's Web site, click here.



Tuesday, March 20, 2007

"How Doctors Think," by Dr. Jerome Groopman

When you describe your symptoms to a doctor, how long does it take the doctor to decide what's wrong with you?

Eighteen seconds, according to Dr. Jerome Groopman, a professor at Harvard Medical School and a staff writer for The New Yorker.

His new book, "How Doctors Think," explores how, sometimes, doctors get it wrong, and what that means for their patients.


Excerpts from Dr. Groopman's interview with CBS Evening News anchor Katie Couric:






Groopman visited The Early Show to talk about it. To see that segment, .

He says the majority of medical mistakes are a result of the way doctors think, rather than technical errors.

The book offers a framework to help doctors and patients to communicate more effectively.

Groopman interviews a range of doctors, then writes about their experiences and mistakes, along with his own experiences as a doctor and a patient.

He says he hopes the book opens a national conversation that helps physicians and patients alike: doctors to see how their thinking patterns might contribute to blunders, and patients to realize how important they are to a doctor's thinking process and diagnosis.

To read an excerpt of "How Doctors Think," click here.



Monday, March 19, 2007

"The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation," by Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff

Fifty years ago, while black Americans were risking their lives in the civil rights movement, reporters put themselves in the way to cover it. In their book, "The Race Beat," Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff tell the story of how the news media shaped the civil rights movement.

The discussed their book on The Early Show Monday. To watch the segment,

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To read an excerpt of "The Race Beat," click here.



Thursday, March 15, 2007

"What the Dead Know," by Laura Lippman

Imagine this: It's 1975. Two young sisters go to a mall, and disappear without a trace. They're gone for 30 years when a woman suddenly appears, claiming to be one of them.

That's the premise of Laura Lippman's latest mystery, "What the Dead Know."

In discussing the book on The Early Show, Lippman talked about the case that inspired it and gave her views on media coverage of kidnap cases.

To watch the segment,

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To read an excerpt from "What the Dead Know," click here.

To visit Lippman's Web site, click here.



Monday, March 12, 2007

"The Smartest Investment Book You'll Ever Read," by Dan Solin

With so many investment options, it's easy to get overwhelmed. But Dan Solin, author of "The Smartest Investment Book You'll Ever Read," says that most people can make better investment choices on their own and it won't take more than 90 minutes a year to set up and manage an investment account.

Read an excerpt of the book and take an asset allocation quiz on Solin's Web site, SmartestInvestmentBook.com.

Watch a video of Solin's appearance on The Early Show

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Monday, March 12, 2007

"NO: Why Kids — of All Ages — Need to Hear It — and Ways Parents Can Say It," by Dr. David Walsh

Many experts say it is important to praise children so they feel good about themselves. But is too much praise creating self-indulgent children?

Psychologist Dr. David Walsh explains the truth about self-esteem in his new book, "NO: Why Kids — of All Ages — Need to Hear It — and Ways Parents Can Say It," which is published by Simon and Schuster a division of CBS.

To read an excerpt, click here.

Watch a video of Dr. Walsh's appearance on The Early Show

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Wednesday, March 7, 2007

"Chocolates on the Pillow Aren't Enough: Reinventing The Customer Experience," by Jonathan M. Tisch

Critics say too many companies think about everything but their customers, and business experts say smart companies put their customers first.

Winning customer loyalty is vital for Jonathan Tisch, chairman and CEO of Loews Hotels, known all over the world for their high-quality customer service.

He writes about some of his favorite companies in his new book, "Chocolates on the Pillow Aren't Enough: Reinventing The Customer Experience."

Tisch discussed it on The Early Show Wednesday. To watch the segment,

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To read an excerpt of "Chocolates on the Pillow Aren't Enough," click here.



Tuesday, March 6, 2007

"Fashionably Buff: Essential Workouts for Looking Great in Anything You Wear," by Sue Fleming

Many of us hide our favorite clothes in the back of our closets because we can't fit into them anymore.

But fitness expert Sue Fleming's new book, "Fashionably Buff," is full of exercises that'll make your body shine in any outfit!

On The Early Show, Fleming shared simple exercises tailor-made for four jeans, bikinis, t-shirts and little black dresses. To watch the segment,

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She encourages her readers to create a home gym using affordable products and household furniture!

For more on Fleming, click here. For more from her on "Fashionably Buff," click here.



Friday, March 2, 2007

"Failing America's Faithful: How Today's Churches Are Mixing God with Politics and Losing Their Way," by Kathleen Kennedy Townsend

As a member of one of America's most prominent Roman Catholic families, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend learned at an early age that faith and social justice go hand in hand.

She learned from her father, Sen. Robert Kennedy (she is his oldest daughter) and her uncle, President John F. Kennedy, the importance of helping those in need.

But she believes America's churches have gone off course in that regard, and writes about it in her new book, "Failing America's Faithful: How Today's Churches Are Mixing God with Politics and Losing Their Way."

She visited The Early Show Friday to discuss it. To watch the video,

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To read an excerpt of "Failing America's Faithful," click here.



Friday, March 2, 2007

"The Way We Garden Now: 41 Pick-and-Choose Projects for Planting Your Paradise Large or Small," by Katherine Whiteside

Intimidated by gardening? Then a good book for you might be Katherine Whiteside's "'The Way We Garden Now: 41 Pick-and-Choose Projects for Planting Your Paradise Large or Small."

It's loaded with practical tips.

She stopped by The Early Show Friday to share tips on one of her favorite projects: an indoor garden. To see the segment,

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To read an excerpt of "The Way We Garden Now," click here. The excerpt is reprinted from "The Way We Garden Now," by Katherine Whiteside. Copyright © 2007. Published by Clarkson Potter, a division of Random House, Inc.



Thursday, March 1, 2007

"Actually, It Is Your Parents' Fault: Why Your Romantic Relationship Isn't Working, and How to Fix It," by Philip Van Munching and Bernie Katz, Ph.D.

Many people have trouble finding the right partner, or communicating with the partner they have.

And their parents may have a lot to do with that, according to the authors of the new book, "Actually, It Is Your Parents' Fault: Why Your Romantic Relationship Isn't Working, and How to Fix It."

In it, Philip Van Munching and Bernie Katz, Ph.D. contend that parents have more to do with relationship woes than many of us realize. They say every time something goes wrong, parents are at least partly to blame.

Van Munching stopped by The Early Show to discuss it and offer relationship advice stemming from the book's main point. To watch the segment, click here.

To read an excerpt of "Actually, It Is Your Parents' Fault," click here.