Baby born after experimental surgery in the womb finally heading home

Baby heads home after surgery in the womb

Ivy Finn spent the first six months of her life inside a hospital after becoming the first to undergo an experimental surgery, before she was even born. It was her only chance of survival after an ultrasound revealed she had hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare birth defect that affects normal blood flow through the heart.

She also had a condition called intact atrial septum, where blood backs up and damages the lungs, worsening her case. When CBS News first met her parents, Rachel and Geoff last year, they were overjoyed Ivy could even be delivered.

"Really she's exceeded expectations in every way," Geoff Finn said.

Now, Ivy is going home. The Finns marked the milestone in Houston, where Texas Children's Hospital agreed to take Ivy's case after the Finns were turned away by other hospitals.

"She has one more surgery probably right around the 2 to 4 year range. And then after that it's really just how long is her heart going to be able to kind of keep up," Geoff Finn said.

Ivy will likely need a heart transplant down the road. Until then, the Finns are trying to raise awareness about hypoplastic left heart syndrome, since surgeries remain experimental. They are also soaking up every second they can with a baby who beat the odds.

"There aren't any words to describe how thankful we are that we have her because we really did not think we would. She's just amazing," Rachel Finn said.