Parents of Cornell freshman found dead after frat party offering $10,000 reward: "We would just like the truth"

Cornell student found dead after frat party

The parents of a Cornell University freshman are offering a $10,000 reward to solve the mystery surrounding their son's death. The body of 18-year-old Antonio Tsialas was found days after he vanished following a fraternity party in October. His is one of four campus deaths nationwide leading to fraternity suspensions or party crack-downs in the past 31 days.

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The last photos Antonio Tsialas took with his mother, Flavia Tomasello, before hjs death Courtesy of Flavia Tomasello

"We would just like the truth," Antonio's father, John Tsialas, told CBS News correspondent Manuel Bojorquez.  

His mother, Flavia Tomasello, showed us the last photos she took with her son on Parents Weekend before he attended a Phi Kappa Psi fraternity party.

"It should have been a happy weekend for us just -- just seeing the excitement he shared with me particularly because I saw him the night before," Tomasello said.

The Cornell University freshman failed to meet his mom and dad the following day. His body was later found at the bottom of a gorge.

"My gut feeling at that point was he was with others," Tsialas said.

"Your message to anyone who saw him that night is what?" Bojorquez asked.

"Please have the courage to come forward and let us know what really happened that night," Tsialas said.

Cornell University police say no foul play is suspected. According to the university's president, officials have not determined Antonio's cause of death but said the party was "an unregistered fraternity sponsored event" where "alcohol was served" and that the events "regrettably follow a pattern of misconduct in the Greek-letter system."

"Antonio would be here tonight if they had not had this unauthorized dirty rush party," family attorney David Bianchi said.

The university has suspended the fraternity. In a statement, Phi Kappa Psi offered its "deepest condolences" and said its "members continue to work with police."

"We as a community we need to know because we need to take actions and to prevent these tragic, senseless things from happening," Tomasello said.