CBSN

Anna's Unprinted Interviews Revealed

Anna Nicole Smith arrives at the 2004 World Music Awards in Las Vegas, Nevada, photo on black
AP PHOTO
Interviews with Anna Nicole Smith conducted by journalist Joyce Wagner in the '90s could shed light on who the pin-up really was.

The New York Daily News reports that these never-printed interviews touch on a range of topics, including physical abuse as a child and intimate details of her marriage to J. Howard Marshall. Wagner is pitching the information she gathered as book project.

"This is Anna talking about who she was," Wagner tells the newspaper. "She was very vulnerable. I may have been the only person listening to her then. And it may have been one of the only times when she was totally sober."

The Daily News reports that the interviews were conducted when Smith was newly out of rehab and had put on some weight. At the time, a suit from a former nanny had forced her to file for bankruptcy.


Photos: Anna Nicole Smith
In one interview that the newspaper heard, Smith said she ran away from home in the seventh grade to get away from her mother, Virgie Arthur. Arthur, an ex-cop, has been trying to get custody of Smith's daughter, Dannielynn, but her appeal was rejected Friday.

"(My mom) came straight upstairs. Without even asking, 'Why did you run away?' She started beating the sh-t out of me. She started kicking me with her boot," Smith said in one interview.

In interviews aired just before her death in February by "Entertainment Tonight" Smith talked of the pain her mother had caused her.

Smith also told Wagner that her mother hit her with a nightstick on one occasion. Arthur's attorney, Debra Rose, didn't return the Daily News' call for comment on these interviews.

Wagner says that Smith also spoke of sexual abuse. "I don't want to talk about that now," Wagner told the newspaper. "But this book will explain a lot."

Smith also told Wagner that she and her husband, Texas billionaire J. Howard Marshall, had a wild sex life.

"We had sex a lot," she said. "He could not exactly satisfy me, which is to be expected. But he was very satisfied himself. That's really all that mattered to me. He satisfied me in other ways. He cared about me. He never looked down at me."

Wagner told the newspaper she wants to use the material from the tapes to write a book because of all of the recent coverage she's seen about Smith. "I feel morally compelled to put her words out there," Wagner said.