Amy Chua's "Tiger Daughter" Responds to Critics

This 2007 photo courtesy of (CC) Larry D. Moore shows author Amy Chua at the Texas Book Festival in Austin, Texas. Chua's book, "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother," released Tuesday, has some adult offspring of Asian and Asian American immigrants weighing in on their own tiger moms. (AP Photo/(CC) Larry D. Moore) NO SALES; EDITORIAL USE ONLY; MANDATORY CREDIT: (CC) LARRY D. MOORE
AP Photo/(CC) Larry D. Moore
Amy Chua
AP

NEW YORK (CBS) Writer Amy Chua has had a lot to answer for this month. Critics of her provocative essay, "Why Chinese Mothers are Superior," and book, "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother," have let her know what they really think about her extreme parenting style. Since the article and book's release, Chua has retreated on some of her statements, saying that she meant the essay and book to be ironic - not a parenting how-to.

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But now, with outrage still swirling around her work - mostly from people who say they can't see her supposed self-mockery in it - Chua's daughter has responded, standing up for her mother - who once called her "garbage" - in a letter posted recently online.

In the letter addressed "Dear Tiger Mom," Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld says her mother taught her to be more independent. Oh, and about that birthday card that her mother made her remake because it wasn't up to her standards: She says, "Funny how some people are convinced that Lulu and I are scarred for life. Maybe if I had poured my heart into (the card), I would have been upset. But let's face it: The card was feeble, and I was busted. It took me 30 seconds; I didn't even sharpen the pencil. That's why, when you rejected it, I didn't feel you were rejecting me. If I actually tried my best at something, you'd never throw it back in my face."

What do you think of Amy Chua's daughter's response?