All Roads Lead To Rove

ALL ROADS LEAD TO ROVE....Even now, more than a year after the fact, we don't truly know what was behind the mass purge of U.S. Attorneys that followed the 2006 midterms. But David Iglesias, one of the fired USAs, hasn't given up trying to figure it out, and Dahlia Lithwick reports his conclusions in Slate:
In his forthcoming book about the scandal, In Justice, co-written with Davin Seay, Iglesias attempts to puzzle out who did him in and why. Like another purged colleague, former U.S. Attorney John McKay from Washington's Western District, who has recently written a long law review article about the firings, Iglesias is persuaded that the nameless, faceless folks who engineered the firings were engaged in serious, if not criminal, wrongdoing. And although the evidence is, he concedes, still mostly circumstantial, one of his chapter titles is "All Roads Lead to Rove." The mild-mannered McKay, for his part, argues for bringing obstruction of justice charges against Gonzales.

What most shines through in the draft copy of Iglesias' manuscript, provided to Slate by the author, are the raw politics animating both his dismissal and the subsequent cover-up. Indeed Iglesias describes that at his very first meeting with then-White House Counsel Alberto Gonzales in 2001, which took place shortly after he became a U.S. attorney, Gonzales offered him the following warning: "This is a tough town. They are out to destroy the president, and it is my job to protect him."

Who knows? Maybe Karl Rove wasn't joking after all when he told an audience on Sunday, "I haven't been indicted yet, but I fully expect to be by the end of the year."