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6 homes of Olympic athletes

Photo courtesy of Zillow

This year's Olympic contenders are now moving into their temporary digs in Rio de Janeiro's Olympic Village.

There have been some hiccups along the way, including Australia refusing to let its athletes move in to the village last week as they said plumbing, electrical and lighting issues made some of the buildings unfit for occupants. Since then, Australian athletes have begun moving in, but representatives from other countries, including Argentina and Sweden, have also complained about the living conditions in the village.

At the time of this writing, the Olympic Village safety concerns have not been fully addressed, and while some of the college-age athletes could feel perfectly at home in the dorm-like facilities, other athletes may find them to be a far cry from the comfortable pads they left behind in their quest for Olympic gold and glory. They're not required to stay in the Olympic Village during their time in Rio, so some athletes may find outside accommodations for their stay.

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The 31 buildings of this year's Olympic Village can host up to 17,950 athletes and staff in 3,604 apartments, according to the Brazilian government. The two-, three- and four-bedroom apartments have two twin beds in each room, with central living room areas. The high-rise buildings boast numerous amenities, including a gym for last-minute training sessions, a massive dining hall, a recreation area with video games, musical instruments, snooker and table tennis, a multi-faith center, park and swimming pools. Shuttles will also be available to take athletes to the nearby Barra da Tijuca beach.

Apartments in the buildings will be for sale after the games are over, offering those of us who are less athletic the chance to live like an Olympian. The sales site doesn't currently specify an asking price for any of the units.

When Team U.S.A. comes back to the States, members will scatter back to their homes across the country. From a $4.4 million Chicago home to a $255,000 four-bedroom house in Arkansas, these homes are as diverse as the athletes themselves.

Click ahead to see the off-season digs of six of this year's Team U.S.A. Olympians.

Jimmy Butler, Basketball

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Chicago Bulls star Jimmy Butler bought this six-bedroom, 4.75-bathroom house in Chicago's River North neighborhood for just over $4.3 million in 2015. This is Butler's first appearance in the Olympic Games.

Jimmy Butler, Basketball

Photo courtesy of Zillow

The three-story house has a landscaped roof deck, elevator, 750-bottle wine cellar, three-car attached garage and a mother-in-law apartment.

Diana Taurasi, Basketball

Photo courtesy of Shorewood Realtors

Diana Taurasi, who plays for the Phoenix Mercury in the WNBA and UMMC Ekaterinburg in Russia, bought this seaside Manhattan Beach, California, getaway in 2014 for $3.3 million. Taurasi already has a stack of Olympic gold medals earned as a member of the U.S. women's basketball team in 2004, 2008 and 2012.

Diana Taurasi, Basketball

Photo courtesy of Shorewood Realtors

The property has three bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms and a two-car garage. The kitchen, great room and balcony offer panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean.

Hope Solo, Soccer

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Hope Solo, goalkeeper for the U.S. Women's Soccer team and the Seattle Reign, has listed her Kirkland, Washington, house for sale. The three-bedroom, three-bathroom house is listed for $1.85 million, $650,000 more than Solo paid when she bought it in 2012. Solo has Olympic gold medals from 2008 and 2012 and several World Cup medals: bronze from 2007, silver from 2011 and gold from 2015.

Hope Solo, Soccer

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The home has a tennis court, swimming pool and hot tub, detached four-car garage with a shop and a half bath and an attached two-car garage. Inside, there's a large kitchen and a den.

Mebrahtom “Meb” Keflezighi, Marathon

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Marathon runner and 2004 silver medalist Meb Keflezighi spends his down time with his family in this four-bedroom, four-bathroom San Diego home with bay and skyline views. Keflezighi purchased the property for $1,377,500 in 2013. He won the silver medal at the 2004 Olympics in Athens and took fourth place at the 2012 Olympics. He has also won the New York and Boston Marathons.

Mebrahtom “Meb” Keflezighi, Marathon

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The home has an attached two-car garage, a balcony on the front of the house, a back deck, two fireplaces and a large kitchen.

Tyson Gay, Sprinter

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Sprinter Tyson Gay bought this four-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom home in Fayetteville, Arkansas, for $255,000 in 2014. Gay is a member of the 4 x 100 meter relay team, an event for which he won a silver medal at the 2012 Olympics. The team was stripped of the medal in 2015 after Gay tested positive for doping in a later race.

Tyson Gay, Sprinter

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The house has an attached two-car garage, a fireplace, vaulted ceilings and a high-end kitchen with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances.

Mariel Zagunis, Fencing

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Mariel Zagunis, the "most decorated fencer in U.S. history," bought this three-bedroom, two-bathroom Beaverton, Oregon ranch house in 2010 for $275,000. This is her fourth trip to the Olympic Games. She competed in 2004, 2008 and 2012 and won gold medals in individual events in 2004 and 2008 and a team bronze medal in 2008.

Mariel Zagunis, Fencing

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Zagunis' house has hardwood floors, a fenced yard with a patio, built-in storage in the master suite and utility room, a one-car attached garage and a storage shed.