Will Ukraine lose even more of its territory to Russia in the east?

The crisis in Ukraine is deepening with the threat of more lost territory for the central government in Kiev.

It's sounding familiar: government offices, in the Eastern Ukraine this time, have been taken over by people claiming to be ordinary pro-Russian Ukrainians, CBS News' Mark Phillips reported.

Russia yet again warned the Ukrainian government against taking repressive action that it says could lead to civil war. Ukrainian forces move in to evict the demonstrators, and the tension rises.

Once again, the fires are burning in Ukraine, and Moscow is being blamed for stoking the flames. Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague has accused Russia of trying to "destabilize" Ukraine.

Demonstrators -- said to be pro-Russian Ukrainians -- have for about two days occupied government buildings in the major cities of Donetsk and Kharkiv. They demanded a referendum -- the same device that was used to annex Crimea to Russia. The White House says many of the occupiers were not local and were being paid, presumably by Russian interests.

Overnight, Ukrainian forces moved in to try to reclaim the buildings in what they're calling an "anti-terrorist" operation. The government in Kiev says 70 people were arrested, and its calling them all criminals.

But the demonstrators still control some government offices in the largely Russian-speaking, industrial heartland of Eastern Ukraine.

Also not for the first time, the ugliness spilled over into Ukraine's parliament. When Pietro Simyenco, the leader of the old pro-Moscow Communist Party got up to accuse Ukraine of bringing its problems upon itself by bringing down the previous pro-Russian government, some of the other members thought they had heard enough, and a fight broke out.

And with the accusations and the fists flying, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has weighed in again, repeating Moscow's claim that it the West, not Russia, that is destabilizing Ukraine. Lavrov called for talks, but events -- not talking -- seem to be driving Ukraine toward another East-West confrontation.

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