WikiLeaks Founder: Clinton Should Resign

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds a press conference at Park Plaza Hotel Oct. 23, 2010, in London. Getty Images

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds a press conference at Park Plaza Hotel Oct. 23, 2010, in London.
Getty Images

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton should resign from office if she ordered American diplomats to spy on United Nations personnel, which recently leaked classified memos appear to have encouraged, the founder of WikiLeaks said Tuesday.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange made the comment in an interview with Richard Stengel, managing editor for Time magazine.

Stengel asked if Clinton's resignation or termination is an outcome Assange would want after his whistleblower organization released hundreds of thousands of classified State Department documents to a number of news outlets, which started publishing articles about them Sunday.

"I don't think it would make much of a difference either way," Assange said of an outcome where Clinton departed her office. "But she should resign, if it can be shown that she was responsible for ordering U.S. diplomatic figures to engage in espionage in the United Nations, in violation of the international covenants to which the U.S. has signed up. Yes, she should resign over that."

The memos encourage American diplomats to collect data about U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and his staff, according to the French newspaper Le Monde. That data included Internet passwords, credit card numbers and frequent flyer account numbers, Le Monde reported.

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  • Alex Sundby

    Alex Sundby is an associate news editor for CBSNews.com

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