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Jeb Bush makes the moral case against Donald Trump

Republican U.S. presidential candidate businessman Donald Trump (L) reacts to former Florida Governor Jeb Bush during the second official Republican presidential candidates debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California, United States, September 16, 2015.

REUTERS

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush's campaign has a new television ad out in New Hampshire that blasts frontrunner Donald Trump and makes a moral case against his candidacy.

The 60-second ad titled "Enough" highlights Trump mocking a disabled reporter - something the billionaire denies doing, The spot begins with Bush at a campaign event declaring, "Just one other thing I got to get off my chest: Donald Trump is a jerk!" It goes on to show a clip of Trump at a November rally in South Carolina appearing to do an impression of New York Times reporter Serge Kovaleski's physical handicap.

Kovaleski has a condition called arthrogryposis which limits the movement of his arms.

In the ad Bush continues, "I believe life is precious, I think life is truly a gift from god. And we're all equal under God's watchful eye. And when anybody, when anybody disparages people with disabilities, it sets me off. That's why I called him a jerk. What kind of person would you want to have in the presidency that does that? "

The former Florida Governor has made his advocacy for the disabled a centerpiece of his campaign. He frequently talks about Berthy De La Rosa-Aponte, a Florida woman with a disabled daughter who confronted him about the needs of the disabled in 1998.

His own advocacy has been controversial in at least on case, while he was governor -- when he weighed in on the legal battle over whether or not to remove a feeding tube to Terri Schiavo. He unsuccessfully battled the Florida court decision to allow her feeding tube to be removed at the state level, in Congress, and even involved his brother, then President George W. Bush. On the trail, he has described that case as one of the most difficult moments in his public life telling an audience in Waterloo Iowa in early December, "I did everything I could, it didn't work out and it did break my heart."