George Zimmerman seeks donations on his new website

George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed Trayvon Martin, claims he was acting in self-defense. Mark Strassmann speaks with people who know Zimmerman for more perspective on who he is. WKMG

Updated 12:30 a.m. ET

(CBS/AP) George Zimmerman, the man who fatally shot unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida, has started a website "to ensure my supporters they are receiving my full attention without any intermediaries."

The authenticity of the website, therealgeorgezimmerman.com, has been confirmed by his lawyers.

"On Sunday February 26th, I was involved in a life altering event which led me to become the subject of intense media coverage. As a result of the incident and subsequent media coverage, I have been forced to leave my home, my school, my employer, my family and ultimately, my entire life," the website states.

The site includes a link to donate funds to help pay for Zimmerman's lawyers and living expenses because of his "forced inability to maintain employment."

"I thank you for your patience and I assure you, the facts will come to light," the website goes on to say. Zimmerman then goes on to quote a philosophy attributed to sociologist James W. Loewen: "People have a right to their own opinions, but not to their own facts. Evidence must be located, not created, and opinions not backed by evidence cannot be given much weight."

Under a section titled "My race," the website has a Thomas Paine quote: "The world is my country, all mankind are my brethren, and to do good is my religion."

The website does not contain Zimmerman's account of his interaction with Trayvon Martin.

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2 Fla. officials step aside in teen death probe

Meanwhile, Florida State Attorney Angela Corey has decided not to use a grand jury in her investigation into the shooting death of Martin.

The grand jury, scheduled by the case's previous prosecutor, was set to convene on April 10.

A statement released by her office said that the decision "should not be considered a factor in the final determination of the case."

Corey was appointed by Gov. Rick Scott last month to take over the investigation. At that time she said she may not need a grand jury.

Corey, the state attorney for the Jacksonville area, was appointed to take over the case after the local state attorney, Norman Wolfinger, recused himself.

Monday's statement said that the investigation continues, and declined further comment.

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