Vick on Dogfighting: I Didn't Care About Animals

Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick speaks to students at Wilbur Cross High School in New Haven, Conn., Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2010. AP Photo/Bob Child

Eagles quarterback Michael Vick urged high school students in Connecticut to show kindness toward animals on Tuesday, adding to the string of appearances he's made since returning from a dogfighting conviction to become one of the NFL's most exciting players.

Vick has spoken at several schools since his release from federal prison in what has been described as an attempt to ensure some good comes out of his negative experience.

At Hillhouse High School in New Haven, he told an audience packed with students that he has matured since his involvement with the "Bad Newz Kennels" dogfighting enterprise on his property in rural southeastern Virginia.

"I didn't really care what people felt about animals," Vick said in comments reported by the New Haven Register. "I didn't care about the welfare of animals."

Michael Vick Dogfighting Timeline

He noted that animals have no choice when they are put into a ring. If you could ask a dog if it wants to fight, "do you think he'll say yeah?" Vick asked.

Vick was convicted in 2007 of conspiracy and running a dogfighting ring and served 18 months in prison and two months of home confinement. The former Atlanta Falcons quarterback was signed by the Eagles in August 2009, less than a month after his release, prompting an outcry from animal rights groups and animal-loving football fans.

Vick has made the most of his second chance in the NFL, leading Philadelphia to three straight wins, including Sunday night's 27-17 victory over the New York Giants at home.

(CBS)
Vick spoke about the dire consequences of dogfighting, and said he is often reminded of his own role in the blood sport.

"Nowadays, every day my daughters ask me if we can get a dog. ... I can't get a dog for my kids," said Vick, who is barred from owning animals.

Left: Jonny Justice, one of the dogs rescued from Vick's kennel.

In September, "Early Show" Resident Veterinarian Dr. Debbye Turner Bell reported that of the 47 dogs rescued from the Bad Newz kennels, 21 went to the Best Friends Animal Sanctuary, which is the largest no-kill sanctuary in Utah. The rest either found foster homes or are in permanent homes.

Michael Vick's Dogs Make a Comeback

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