Obama retools, Romney builds on momentum post-debate

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (L) speaks as Democratic presidential candidate, U.S. President Barack Obama (R) listens during the Presidential Debate at the University of Denver on October 3, 2012 in Denver, Colorado. The first of four debates for the 2012 Election, three Presidential and one Vice Presidential, is moderated by PBS's Jim Lehrer and focuses on domestic issues: the economy, health care, and the role of government. AP Photo

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (L) speaks as Democratic presidential candidate, U.S. President Barack Obama (R) listens during the Presidential Debate at the University of Denver on October 3, 2012 in Denver, Colorado. The first of four debates for the 2012 Election, three Presidential and one Vice Presidential, is moderated by PBS's Jim Lehrer and focuses on domestic issues: the economy, health care, and the role of government.
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (L) speaks as Democratic presidential candidate, U.S. President Barack Obama (R) listens during the Presidential Debate at the University of Denver on October 3, 2012 in Denver, Colorado.
AP Photo

(CBS News) Following their first debate the previous night in Colorado, President Obama and GOP challenger Mitt Romney were back on the campaign trail Thursday.

A more animated Obama, following his performance at the debate that was reportedly described as lackluster, told a crowd in Wisconsin: "When I got onto the stage, I met this very spirited fellow who claimed to be Mitt Romney. But it couldn't have been Mitt Romney, because the real Mitt Romney has been running around the country for the last year promising $5 trillion in tax cuts that favor the wealthy."

Watch Nancy Cordes' "CBS Evening News" report on the Obama campaign following the president's lackluster debate appearance:

Supporter Darien Wilson, who was at the appearance, was wondering where that spirited Obama the night before.

"I was wanting him to have more enthusiasm in his answers and hit back a little more. I felt like Romney was lying right and left. I was like, 'Come on, call him on that.'"

Meanwhile Romney was capitalizing on his sparkling debate performance and made a surprise appearance Thursday morning before the Colorado Conservative Political Action Conference.

Watch Jaw Crawford's ' "CBS Evening News" report on the revitalized Romney campaign:

"Last night, I thought was a great opportunity for the American people to see two very different visions for the country," said Romney. "And I think it was helpful to be able to describe those visions. I saw the president's vision as trickle-down government and I don't think that's what America believes in."

In addition Romney, who was later campaigning in Virginia, is also ramping up spending on television after being outspent by the president more than 2-1 in swing states. On Thursday morning released a new ad reinforcing his message in the debate.

Obama campaign readies post-debate counterpunch
Romney basks in debate afterglow at surprise CPAC visit
Moving on from debate, Obama uses humor to jab Romney
Post-debate, Romney and supporters go negative

  • Nancy Cordes On Twitter»

    Nancy Cordes is CBS News' congressional correspondent.

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