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What is Mexico doing to stop "El Chapo" from escaping again?

The Mexican prison officials in charge of preventing Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman from escaping incarceration for a third time are taking extreme measures, according to a report in the El Universal newspaper.

Having made his most recent escape via a tunnel dug directly into his cell at the maximum-security Antiplano prison last year, Guzman is now being moved around the facility on a regular basis. According to El Universal, he was in seven different cells over the course of his first five nights back at Antiplano. They make the cell changes at random, meaning he can spend hours or a couple days in any given location.

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Mexican media are reporting that this undated photo shows Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman in a jail cell.
Federal Center of Social Adaptation

The newspaper says prison staff have deployed sniffer dogs trained specifically to detect Guzman's distinct odor, installed hundreds of new cameras, and reinforced the concrete floors of at least some cells with steel.

Every time the Sinaloa drug cartel boss is moved between cells, prison staff follow elaborate and carefully laid out protocol; he's followed by a team of guards, all wearing helmet cameras. Some of the guards remain outside his cell at all times. Each move has to be personally signed-off by the head of Mexico's federal prison service.

According to El Universal, when Guzman last escaped there were about 100 fixed-position cameras in operation at Antiplano. That number, the paper says, has already risen to 400, and by this spring it is expected to be close to 1,000.

A prison official also told El Universal that a whole range of hi-tech devices -- including motion sensors in air ducts and in the earth beneath the building itself -- which were for some reason disconnected when Guzman last escaped, were now fully functional.

Guzman was captured earlier this month in Los Mochis, Sinaloa state, six months after his cartel tunnelled him out of Antiplano. The tunnel opened up in the shower cubicle of his cell, which was not visible to the cameras used at the time.

The U.S. government is seeking his extradition, but it is unclear how long that process could take.

Mexican authorities say it was Guzman's decision to meet Mexican actress Kate del Castillo and Hollywood superstar Sean Penn for an interview that eventually led them to the cartel capo.

Penn told CBS News that his only regret about meeting Guzman was that people are focusing on his persona more than what he views as the failed U.S. effort to stem drug trafficking and the death and destruction it causes.

Del Castillo, with whom Guzman appears to have become infatuated over the course of many text messages and other communications, is now being sought by Mexican officials for questioning in connection to the case.